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I have an interface IBaseInterface and a class BaseClass.

When I refer to BaseClass via the IBaseInterface type the bindings with event names won't fire. However the normal binding (without event name) fires.

If I refer to BaseClass with Object or BaseClass types all is OK and the bindings fire.

IBaseInterface:

[Event(name="propTwoChanged", type="flash.events.Event")]
[Event(name="propThreeChanged", type="flash.events.Event")]

[Bindable]

public interface IBaseInterface extends IEventDispatcher{

    function get propOne() :Number;
    function set propOne(value:Number) :void;

    [Bindable(event="propTwoChanged")]
    function get propTwo() :Number;

    [Bindable(event="propThreeChanged")]
    function get propThree() :Number;

}

BaseClass:

[Event(name="propTwoChanged", type="flash.events.Event")]
[Event(name="propThreeChanged", type="flash.events.Event")]

[Bindable]

public class BaseClass extends EventDispatcher implements IBaseInterface{

    private var _propOne:Number = 0;
    public function get propOne() :Number{
        return _propOne;
    }
    public function set propOne(value:Number) :void{
        _propOne = value;
        dispatchEvent(new Event('propTwoChanged'));
        dispatchEvent(new Event('propThreeChanged'));
    }

    [Bindable(event="propTwoChanged")]
    public function get propTwo() :Number{
        return propOne * 2;
    }

    [Bindable(event="propThreeChanged")]
    public function get propThree() :Number{
        return propOne / 2;
    }

}

So, to clarify the problem:

  • propTwo and propThree bindings on IBaseInterface do not fire.
  • propOne binding is OK, this does not have an event name.
  • The problem only occurs when accessing via the interface, other types are OK.
share|improve this question
    
So far on this I have double checked that all the metadata on the interface matches the class, and I have even extended IEventDispatcher –  Drahcir May 2 '13 at 15:44
    
The real use case for this will be where I have IModelBase and a lot of different models that all implement IModelBase in different ways. That way I can reuse the same view and just switch out the model as required. –  Drahcir May 2 '13 at 15:48
    
I find the whole construction a bit strange anyways: there's a lot of redundancy there. You're repeating the exact same metadata from the implementation in the interface and there's a class-wide [Bindable] tag that is overridden (maybe?) by tags with custom events. Also by putting the metadata on the interface, you're actually already saying how the implementations should be implemented. –  RIAstar May 2 '13 at 15:55
    
@RIAstar: I think the real use case makes more sense, I also extend IBaseInterface and BaseClass so the redundancy is reduced. Also I only reproduced the metadata in the interface because I read that I needed to for the bindings to work. –  Drahcir May 2 '13 at 16:03
1  
As RIAStar mentioned, your code may not be working as expected because of the class level [Bindable] may be interfering w/the two bindings at the property level. What happens if you move that class level [Bindable] to property 1 (and keep everything else the same). –  Sunil D. May 2 '13 at 17:10
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have found 2 options to fix this:

Option 1

Defining a single [Bindable(event="...")] metadata on the interface (not on the function signatures), and then dispatching a single event to update all properties on the interface.

IBaseInterface:

[Event(name="updateBindings", type="flash.events.Event")]
[Bindable(event="updateBindings")]
public interface IBaseInterface extends IEventDispatcher{

    function get propOne() :Number;
    function set propOne(value:Number) :void;

    function get propTwo() :Number;

    function get propThree() :Number;

}

BaseClass:

[Event(name="updateBindings", type="flash.events.Event")]
[Bindable(event="updateBindings")]
public class BaseClass extends EventDispatcher implements IBaseInterface{

    private var _propOne:Number = 0;
    public function get propOne() :Number{
        return _propOne;
    }
    public function set propOne(value:Number) :void{
        _propOne = value;
        dispatchEvent(new Event('updateBindings'));
    }

    public function get propTwo() :Number{
        return propOne * 2;
    }

    public function get propThree() :Number{
        return propOne / 2;
    }

}

This is a little clumsy I think, if there are a lot of properties or a lot of listeners in the view then it would be too resource intensive.


Option 2

Defining a single [Bindable] (without event) on the interface, and then from the class directly dispatching a PropertyChangeEvent.

IBaseInterface:

[Bindable]
public interface IBaseInterface extends IEventDispatcher{

    function get propOne() :Number;
    function set propOne(value:Number) :void;

    function get propTwo() :Number;

    function get propThree() :Number;

}

BaseClass:

[Bindable]
public class BaseClass extends EventDispatcher implements IBaseInterface{

    private var _propOne:Number = 0;
    public function get propOne() :Number{
        return _propOne;
    }
    public function set propOne(value:Number) :void{
        _propOne = value;
        dispatchEvent(new PropertyChangeEvent(PropertyChangeEvent.PROPERTY_CHANGE, true, true, PropertyChangeEventKind.UPDATE, 'propTwo'));
        dispatchEvent(new PropertyChangeEvent(PropertyChangeEvent.PROPERTY_CHANGE, true, true, PropertyChangeEventKind.UPDATE, 'propThree'));
    }

    public function get propTwo() :Number{
        return propOne * 2;
    }

    public function get propThree() :Number{
        return propOne / 2;
    }

}

This way is best I think, it is less intensive than option 1 because only the required properties are updated. It also cleans up the code, most metadata can be removed from the class and interface.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting exercise. +1 for testing and sharing –  RIAstar May 2 '13 at 19:14
    
Did you try not marking the entire Class as Bindable? The Flex compiler is generating some code for you that is probably interfering, and I bet you could get exactly the behavior you want if you removed that Bindable metadata. –  Amy Blankenship May 2 '13 at 20:16
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