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I'm using a RotateAnimation to rotate an image that I'm using as a custom cyclical spinner in Android. Here's my rotate_indefinitely.xml file, which I placed in res/anim/:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<rotate
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:fromDegrees="0"
    android:toDegrees="360"
    android:pivotX="50%"
    android:pivotY="50%"
    android:repeatCount="infinite"
    android:duration="1200" />

When I apply this to my ImageView using AndroidUtils.loadAnimation(), it works great!

spinner.startAnimation( 
    AnimationUtils.loadAnimation(activity, R.anim.rotate_indefinitely) );

The one problem is that the image rotation seems to pause at the top of every cycle.

In other words, the image rotates 360 degrees, pauses briefly, then rotates 360 degrees again, etc.

I suspect that the problem is that the animation is using a default interpolator like android:iterpolator="@android:anim/accelerate_interpolator" (AccelerateInterpolator), but I don't know how to tell it not to interpolate the animation.

How can I turn off interpolation (if that is indeed the problem) to make my animation cycle smoothly?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 105 down vote accepted

You are right about AccelerateInterpolator; you should use LinearInterpolator instead.

You can use the built-in android.R.anim.linear_interpolator from your animation XML file with android:interpolator="@android:anim/linear_interpolator".

Or you can create your own XML interpolation file in your project, e.g. name it res/anim/linear_interpolator.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<linearInterpolator xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" />

And add to your animation XML:

android:interpolator="@anim/linear_interpolator"

Special Note: If your rotate animation is inside a set, setting the interpolator does not seem to work. Making the rotate the top element fixes it. (this will save your time.)

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1  
Works perfectly! Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you! –  emmby Oct 28 '09 at 17:18
1  
This is because interpolator was spelled wrong (no "n"). You don't need to make your own –  Kingpin Feb 18 '11 at 20:42
12  
I've tried every interpolator available, including the linear, and i still get this little "hitch" at the beginning of every cycle. –  Adam Rabung Aug 23 '11 at 19:01
6  
If your rotate animation is inside a set, setting the interpolator does not seem to work. Making the rotate the top element fixes it –  shalafi May 16 '12 at 11:52
    
It works perfectly....thanks. –  Jay Parker Mar 1 '13 at 8:59

Try using toDegrees="359" since 360º and 0º are the same

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This works fine! Thanks!

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    <rotate xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:duration="1600"
    android:fromDegrees="0"
    android:interpolator="@android:anim/linear_interpolator"
    android:pivotX="50%"
    android:pivotY="50%"
    android:repeatCount="infinite"
    android:toDegrees="358" />

To reverse rotate:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    <rotate xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:duration="1600"
    android:fromDegrees="358"
    android:interpolator="@android:anim/linear_interpolator"
    android:pivotX="50%"
    android:pivotY="50%"
    android:repeatCount="infinite"
    android:toDegrees="0" />
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No matter what I tried, I couldn't get this to work right using code (and setRotation) for smooth rotation animation. What I ended up doing was making the degree changes so small, that the small pauses are unnoticeable. If you don't need to do too many rotations, the time to execute this loop is negligible. The effect is a smooth rotation:

        float lastDegree = 0.0f;
        float increment = 4.0f;
        long moveDuration = 10;
        for(int a = 0; a < 150; a++)
        {
            rAnim = new RotateAnimation(lastDegree, (increment * (float)a),  Animation.RELATIVE_TO_SELF, 0.5f, Animation.RELATIVE_TO_SELF, 0.5f);
            rAnim.setDuration(moveDuration);
            rAnim.setStartOffset(moveDuration * a);
            lastDegree = (increment * (float)a);
            ((AnimationSet) animation).addAnimation(rAnim);
        }
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I had exactly the same problem! Pruning the -Element that wrapped the -Element solves the problem! Thanks to Shalafi! :D

So your Rotation_ccw.xml should loook like this:

<rotate
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:fromDegrees="0"
    android:toDegrees="-360"
    android:pivotX="50%"
    android:pivotY="50%"
    android:duration="2000"
    android:fillAfter="false"
    android:startOffset="0"
    android:repeatCount="infinite"
    android:interpolator="@android:anim/linear_interpolator"
    />

Greetings

Christopher

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Is it possible that because you go from 0 to 360, you spend a little bit more time at 0/360 than you are expecting? Perhaps set toDegrees to 359 or 358.

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1  
Great theory. I'm pretty sure it's not that because the speedup/slowdown is quite smooth and deliberate looking. Just in case though I tried decreasing the degrees to 358 and there was no discernible change in behavior. –  emmby Oct 28 '09 at 0:33

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