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I'm practicing my Ruby meta-programming and trying to write my own loop method that will handle most of the ugliness in listening to a socket, but give the programmer the chance to specify the loop break condition and a block of things to do after each IO.select/sleep cycle.

What I want to be able to write is something like this:

x = 1
while_listening_until( x == 0 ) do
  x = rand(10)
  puts x
end

What I've been able to make work is:

def while_listening_until( params, &block )

  break_cond = params[ :condition ] || "false"
  loop {
    #other listening things are happening here
    yield
    break if params[:binding].eval( break_cond )
  }
end

x = 1
while_listening_until( :condition => "x==0", :binding => binding() ) do
  x = rand(10)
  puts x
end

So, how do I make all that eval and binding ugliness go away?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is where lambdas are handy:

def while_listening_until( condition, &block )
  loop {
    #other listening things are happening here
    yield
    break if condition.call
  }
end

x = 1
while_listening(lambda{ x == 0 }) do
  x = rand(10)
  puts x
end
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! Thx. Nice and clean. –  user2221533 May 2 '13 at 17:13
    
When matz designed Ruby, he analyzed the Smalltalk and Lisp standard libraries and noticed that the vast majority of higher-order procedures only take a single procedure argument. So, he added specialized support for methods that take a single procedure argument in the form of blocks. However, when writing your own control structures, this assumption doesn't hold, because they usually take at least two procedure arguments: the condition and the body. That's why if, while, case and friends are keywords and not methods: because otherwise they would be ugly with all those lambdas. –  Jörg W Mittag May 2 '13 at 18:59

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