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There's a school of thought that null values should not be allowed in a relational database. That is, a table's attribute (column) should not allow null values. Coming from a software development background, I really don't understand this. It seems that if null is valid within the context of the attribute, then it should be allowed. This is very common in Java where object references are often null. Not having an extensive database experience, I wonder if I'm missing something here.

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There's a school of thought that schemas should be fully normalized, too. Neither school ever graduated to the real world. :) –  Chris Noe Oct 2 '08 at 19:27
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Nulls are an artifact of the impedance between RDBMS's and reality. They are a massive systemic hack to overcome that impedance. The solution isn't to do away with nulls, that's impractical within the context of RDBMS's. The solution is new kinds of databases. –  Brad Thomas Mar 5 '14 at 16:27

33 Answers 33

It seems that if null is valid within the context of the attribute, then it should be allowed.

But what does null mean? That's the rub. It's "no value", but there's a dozen different reasons there might be no value there, and "null" doesn't give you any clue which one it means in this case. (Not set yet, not applicable to this instance, not applicable to this type, not known, not knowable, not found, error, program bug, ...)

This is very common in Java where object references are often null.

There's a school of thought that says null references there are bad there, too. Same problem: what does null mean?

IIRC, Java has both "null" and "uninitialized" (though no syntax for the latter). So Gosling realized the folly of using "null" for every kind of "no value". But why stop with just two?

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Related question: How do I enforce data integrity rules in my database?

I initially started with many small tables with almost zero nullalbe fields. Then I learned about the LINQ to SQL IsDiscriminator property and that LINQ to SQL only supports single table inheritance. Therefore I re-engineered it as a single table with lots of nullalbe fields.

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As an analyst/programmer with 30 years experience I'll just say NULLs should be taken out back and put out of their misery.

-1, 01/01/0001/12/31/9999 and ? will all suffice just as well without the mind distorting code needed to cope with these nasty NULLs.

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I've seen more code break in bad (subtle) ways because someone used some of the magic null numbers wrongly then I've seen it break because of nulls. –  Pieter B Apr 11 '14 at 13:32

protected by DNA Aug 22 '14 at 10:07

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