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To begin with, I don't fully understand the prototypal structure of Javascript so this may not be possible.

If I have ...

var vector = function( x, y ) {
    this.x = x || 0;
    this.y = y || 0;
}

var obj = function() {
    this.position = new vector( 0, 0, 0 );
}

var cube = new obj();

... how can I add a property x to obj such that calling cube.x is equivalent to cube.position.x. I think it should be possible to make properties of each reference the same value, but I'm just not sure of the syntax. Something like obj.prototype.x = obj.position.x doesn't work because obj.position is undefined.

I would like the following behaviour to be possible

alert(cube.position.x); // 0
alert(cube.x); // 0

cube.position.x = 2;
alert(cube.position.x); // 2
alert(cube.x); // 2

cube.x = 4;
alert(cube.position.x); // 4
alert(cube.x); // 4

Is this possible?

I should probably mention that I'm working with Three.js so rewriting the objects isn't an option, just adding to them and their prototypes.

share|improve this question
1  
You can only do this in browsers that support getters and setters. –  zzzzBov May 2 '13 at 17:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To get cube.x to return whatever cube.position.x contains, you'd need to define accessors and mutators for obj.prototype.x. Accessors and mutators are a relatively newer feature in JavaScript, and are not supported in most versions of IE.

var vector = function( x, y ) {
    this.x = x || 0;
    this.y = y || 0;
}

var obj = function() {
    this.position = new vector( 0, 0, 0 );
}
obj.prototype = {
    ...your prorotype methods here...
};
Object.defineProperty(obj.prototype, 'x', {
    get: function () {
        return this.position.x;
    },
    set: function (val) {
        this.position.x = val;
    }
});

//alternatively:
obj.prototype = {
    get x() {
        return this.position.x;
    },
    set x(val) {
        this.position.x = val;
    }
};

var cube = new obj();
cube.x; //0
cube.x = 10;
cube.position.x; //10
share|improve this answer
    
@alex23, the point was to show a placeholder of where the prototype would be declared. –  zzzzBov May 2 '13 at 17:14
    
You are awesome! Haven't heard of accessors and mutators before. I guess that's why I couldn't find an answer online. What are the differences between Object.defineProperty(obj.prototype, 'x', {}); and obj.prototype = {};. Are they both accepted standards? Is one faster? –  wackozacko May 2 '13 at 17:34
    
using get x() and set x() in a literal is for convenience. Object.defineProperty is meant for being able to dynamically build accessors and mutators. Just remember that whatever you write using these accessors and mutators won't be backwards compatible. –  zzzzBov May 2 '13 at 17:43
    
@alex23, the point of overriding the prototype with an object literal is to avoid constantly calling Class.prototype.foo = ...; Class.prototype.bar = ...; Class.prototype.baz = ...;. It's such a common convention that I threw it in as a placeholder. You could certainly leave it off if you're not adding methods to the prototype, however you'll need to make sure the Object.defineProperty call happens after you change the prototype if you are overriding the prototype. –  zzzzBov May 2 '13 at 18:11

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