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Currently, I have this code:

@-webkit-keyframes blinker {  
  from { opacity: 1.0; }
  to { opacity: 0.0; }
}

.waitingForConnection {
  -webkit-animation-name: blinker;  
  -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;  
  -webkit-animation-timing-function: cubic-bezier(.5, 0, 1, 1);
  -webkit-animation-duration: 1.7s; 
}   

It blinks, but it only blinks in "one direction", I mean, it only fades out, and then it appears back with opacity: 1.0, then again fades out, appears again, and so on... I would like it to fade out, and then "raise" from this fade back again to opacity: 1.0. Is that possible?

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2  
Where's the ol' Netscape <blink> tag when you need it?! Are you trying to revert back to the 90s? –  Brian Stephens May 2 '13 at 17:42
1  
@BrianStephens We are in 2013 :) –  Mr. Alien May 2 '13 at 17:42
1  
If you take a look on the right of this page, there is a column entitled Related with many 'related' topics. Take a look at some of those .. you'll be able to study all that you need. –  Milky ways patterns May 2 '13 at 17:43
2  
I know I'm in 2013, but I'm not sure @ojek is! Blinking text was deprecated more than a decade ago for good reason. –  Brian Stephens May 2 '13 at 17:44
1  
You can take a quick course about css transitions on bradshaw : css3.bradshawenterprises.com –  Milky ways patterns May 2 '13 at 17:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 73 down vote accepted

You are first setting opacity: 1; and than you are ending it on 0, so it starts from 0% and ends on 100% so instead you should start on 0% and set the opacity to 1, going ahead set the opacity to 0 at 50% and than again set it to 1 at 100%.

Demo

.blink_me {
    -webkit-animation-name: blinker;
    -webkit-animation-duration: 1s;
    -webkit-animation-timing-function: linear;
    -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;

    -moz-animation-name: blinker;
    -moz-animation-duration: 1s;
    -moz-animation-timing-function: linear;
    -moz-animation-iteration-count: infinite;

    animation-name: blinker;
    animation-duration: 1s;
    animation-timing-function: linear;
    animation-iteration-count: infinite;
}

@-moz-keyframes blinker {  
    0% { opacity: 1.0; }
    50% { opacity: 0.0; }
    100% { opacity: 1.0; }
}

@-webkit-keyframes blinker {  
    0% { opacity: 1.0; }
    50% { opacity: 0.0; }
    100% { opacity: 1.0; }
}

@keyframes blinker {  
    0% { opacity: 1.0; }
    50% { opacity: 0.0; }
    100% { opacity: 1.0; }
}

Here, am setting animation duration should be 1 second, than am setting the timing to linear that means it will be constant throughout, and last am using animation-iteration-count and I've set that to infinite that means it will go on and on. Am calling the same properties with a -webkit prefix for webkit browser support as well as -moz for older versions of Firefox.


As commented, this won't work on older versions of Internet Explorer, for that, you need to use jQuery or JavaScript....

function blinker() {
    $('.blink_me').fadeOut(500);
    $('.blink_me').fadeIn(500);
}

setInterval(blinker, 1000); //Runs every second

Demo (Blinker using jQuery)

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1  
this is great, thank you! Do you know of a solution for IE? –  Oam Psy Feb 12 at 14:58
    
@OamPsy Edited my answer :) –  Mr. Alien Feb 15 at 6:08
    
Just noticed that this, applied to one text element, consumes ridiculous amount of CPU on my computer using firefox. Beware. –  Alex Sep 10 at 9:00
    
please define "older versions of Internet Explorer", it doesn't appear to work in 9 –  Jarrod Roberson Dec 2 at 23:05

Use the alternate value for animation-direction (and you don't need to add any keframes this way).

alternate

The animation should reverse direction each cycle. When playing in reverse, the animation steps are performed backward. In addition, timing functions are also reversed; for example, an ease-in animation is replaced with an ease-out animation when played in reverse. The count to determinate if it is an even or an odd iteration starts at one.

CSS:

.waitingForConnection {
  animation: blinker 1.7s cubic-bezier(.5, 0, 1, 1) infinite alternate;  
}
@keyframes blinker {  
  from { opacity: 1; }
  to { opacity: 0; }
}

Also, don't use just the WebKit version. Add the unprefixed one after it as well. If you just want to write less code, use the shorthand.

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Will this work if we need a smoothing flow like 0 25 50 75 100? –  Mr. Alien May 2 '13 at 17:54
    
I'm afraid I don't understand the question. –  Ana May 2 '13 at 17:56
    
Your solution seems good and what he needs is kinda constant glow, so opacity should go +1 than 0 and back to +1, where he was using to from, which is 0% to 100% so he was not able to get back to 0 opacity, my question was that what if we need smoothness in transition, can we achieve that by using alternate? –  Mr. Alien May 2 '13 at 17:58

Alternatively if you do not want a gradual transition between show and hide (e.g. a blinking text cursor) you could use something like:

/* Also use prefixes with @keyframes and animation to support current browsers */
@keyframes blinker {  
  0% { visibility: visible; }
  50% { visibility: hidden; }
  100% { visibility: visible; }
}
.cursor {
  animation: blinker steps(1) 1s infinite;
}

Every 1s .cursor will go from visible to hidden.

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@-webkit-keyframes blinker {  
  0% { opacity: 1.0; }
  50% { opacity: 0.0; }
  100% { opacity: 1.0; }
}
share|improve this answer

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