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in C is: *(array) equivalent to array[0]?

Therefore is *(array+2) equivalent to array[2]?

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See also the "Arrays and Pointers" section of the C FAQ list: c-faq.com/aryptr/index.html –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 1:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, for instance:

given:

int a[10];

Then

*(a + 2)

is equivalent to

a[2]

and just for good measure.

a[2]

is equivalent to

2[a]
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OK, you lost me. How can 2[a] = a[2]? –  James Black Oct 28 '09 at 1:10
    
Yup storage address 2 plus addres of "a" is the same as address of "a" plus 2! –  James Anderson Oct 28 '09 at 1:16
1  
Addition is commutative. –  hirschhornsalz Oct 28 '09 at 1:35
1  
Nice point on 2[a]. +1 –  Tim Oct 28 '09 at 1:42
1  
I had a boss that called that "arraying through and index"... :) –  dicroce Oct 28 '09 at 1:55

You may want to look at this, for more help: http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/languages/fortran/append-c.html

4) Taking a subscript with value i is equivalent to the operation: "pointer-add i and then type-dereference the sum", i.e.

      xxx[i] = *(xxx # i)

As others mentioned, the answer is yes, but you may want to get a better understanding.

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The simple answer is: Yes.

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The simple comment is: Useless without explanation. –  Hannele Jan 31 '12 at 21:25

Yes and yes. (Padding to required 15 character length.)

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