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How do you declare an array of arrays of arrays? Say I have an array s[]. s[0] will contain an other array a[] and a[0] will contain an array b[]. How would you do it with pointers?

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cdecl.org –  user529758 May 2 '13 at 19:36
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Do you want s[0] to be an array or to be a pointer to the elements of an array? Do you want a[0] to be an array or to be a pointer to the elements of an array? –  Eric Postpischil May 2 '13 at 19:41
    
To clarify Eric's questions: one is a matter of 'clever' indexing and is actually just one big array. The other uses actual pointer references, and the final multi-dimensional array is no longer contiguous. –  Kenogu Labz May 2 '13 at 19:45
    
Are you coming from PHP? :-) –  Kerrek SB May 2 '13 at 19:52
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Well in the end they both achieve the same, the only thing is that with pointer references I the length of my strings won't be fixed. For what I want to do, either one of them work, but the pointer version is obviously less of a hassle. @Kerrek: Nope, C was my first :-) –  Metaliinuxite May 2 '13 at 20:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
// b is an array of int.  (N is some number.)
int b[N];

// a Option 0:  a is an array of M arrays of N int.  (M is some number.)
int a[M][N];

// a Option 1:  a is an array of M pointers to int.
int *a[M];
a[0] = b;
// Other elements of a must also be assigned in some way.

// s Option 0:  s is an array of L arrays of M arrays of N int.  (L is some number.)
int s[L][M][N];

// s Option 1:  s is an array of L arrays of M pointers to int.
int *s[L][M];
s[0][0] = b;
// Other elements of s must also be assigned in some way.

// s Option 2:  s is an array of L pointers to arrays of N int.
int (*s[L])[N];
s[0] = a; // Can use a from a Option 0, not a from a Option 1.
// Other elements of s must also be assigned in some way.

// s Option 3:  s is an array of L pointers to pointers to int.
int **s[L];
s[0] = a; // Can use a from a Option 1, not a from a Option 0.
// Other elements of s must also be assigned in some way.

There are also options in which each object is a pointer at its highest level, instead of an array. I have not shown those. They would require defining something for the pointer to point to.

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+1: Nice answer especially for answering questions the OP should have asked but didn't know enough to do so. –  wallyk May 2 '13 at 20:17
    
Don't you want to do s[0] = a in option 2? (to make it 3-dimensional) –  anatolyg May 2 '13 at 20:28
    
@anatolyg: Yes, I think that is better. –  Eric Postpischil May 2 '13 at 20:40

A simple approach.

int length = 10;

int b[5] = {0,1,2,5,4};

int c[7] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7};

int** s = malloc(sizeof(int*) * length);

s[1] = b;
s[2] = c; 

and so on...

This example is for 2 layer. Making pointer s to be ***s and appropriate changes, to make it 3 layer.

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s+1 and s+2 are not lvalues and cannot be on the left side of assignments. You may have intended s[1] and s[2]. And this gives s only two layers, not the three requested in the question. –  Eric Postpischil May 2 '13 at 20:08
    
@EricPostpischil ya you are correct. s+1 is not compiling. But I thought s+1 to be a syntatic sugar of s[1]. Ref : For instance, in the C language the a[i] notation is syntactic sugar for *(a + i) - Wikipedia. –  EAGER_STUDENT May 2 '13 at 20:20
    
@EAGER_STUDENT: s+1 is not *(s+1). The asterisk makes a world of difference. –  dreamlax May 2 '13 at 20:35

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