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I have a container object that holds either an int, a float or a string. I have a queue of these containers that are processed in a similar way. At the moment I have separate getters for the different data types. This isn't particularly elegant, given that each container instance will only hold one data type at a time.

class MyContainer
{
    MyContainer(float value);
    MyContainer(int value);
    MyContainer(string value);

    int getIntValue();
    float getFloatValue();
    string getStringValue();
}

void processContainer(MyContainer& container)
{
    // the following will not work, but is desired:
    process(container->getValue()); // compilation error
}

void process(int value) {}
void process(float value) {}
void process(string value) {}

Is there a way that I can exploit parameter overloading of the process method above? For example, some way of getting to the point where I can simply call process(container->getValue())?

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given that each container instance will only hold one data type at a time : What about using union? –  EAGER_STUDENT May 2 '13 at 20:11
    
If each container will only hold one data type, why not make the container a template? –  Ben Voigt May 2 '13 at 20:18
    
std::string can't be included in a union. I could encapsulate the integer and float, but that won't solve my problem (it will just save me a byte). –  MM. May 2 '13 at 20:18
1  
I wonder, why isn't process a member of MyContainer? –  jrok May 2 '13 at 20:18
1  
boost::variant! This is a solved problem. Don’t have the time to answer properly now but static_visitor is what you’re searching. –  Konrad Rudolph May 2 '13 at 20:21

6 Answers 6

You can use templates and traits to restrict your templated code to the types string, float, int.

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If I understand your purpose correctly, you want to let MyContainer hold either int,float or string.

In this case definitely you need template to define your class:

template<typename T>
class MyContainer 
{
private:
    T _value;

    MyContainer(T value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }

public:
    T GetValue()
    {
        return _value;
    }
}

you can define it's instance like this:

MyContainer<float>  v1(10.11); 
MyContainer<int>  v2(10);
MyContainer<string>  v3("dddddd");

now you can use GetValue to get different type of values:

v1.GetValue();
v2.GetValue();
v3.GetValue();
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An alternative is to use the Visitor pattern. This allows you to dispatch based on the type, dynamically.

struct Float;
struct Integer;

struct ContainerVisitor {
    virtual void visit(Float& value) = 0;
    virtual void visit(Integer& value) = 0;
    // etc.
};

struct Container {
    virtual void accept(ContainerVisitor& visitor) = 0;
};

struct Integer : Container{
    virtual void accept(ContainerVisitor& visitor) {
        visitor.visit(*this);
    }
};

struct Float : Container{
    virtual void accept(ContainerVisitor& visitor) {
        visitor.visit(*this);
    }
};

Then whatever action it is you want to perform, you put it in a class derived from ContainerVisitor:

struct Processor : ContainerVisitor {
    virtual void visit(Float& value) {
        // equivalent of your process(float);
    }
    virtual void visit(Integer& value) {
        // equivalent of your process(int);
    }
};

Used like:

int main() {
    Processor processor;

    Integer i;
    Float f;

    i.accept(processor);
    f.accept(processor);
}
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A very nice and elegant solution –  Amadeus May 2 '13 at 23:28

The problem is knowing which value should be selected by processContainer from the MyContainer. Since this knowledge is encapsulated within the MyContainer, maybe the process call should be too, or at least the dispatch to it. That is:

class MyContainer
{
    MyContainer(float value);
    MyContainer(int value);
    MyContainer(string value);

    invokeProcess()
    {
       // call correct overload of process based on value stored
    }

    int getIntValue();
    float getFloatValue();
    string getStringValue();
}

void processContainer(MyContainer& container)
{
    container->invokeProcess(); 
}

You could also implement this with polymorphism, and several subclasses of MyContainer. You'd basically be trading the switching logic from a case statement inside invokeProcess to a virtual function lookup outside it.

Others have mentioned a union. You'd really need a discriminated union, including an enum to know what type the value was.

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A union might work if you know ahead of time the type for each value. QVariant is an option if you're okay with using the Qt library.

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Unfortunately, probably not, at least not in any elegant way. C++ doesn't allow overloaded functions that differ in only the return type, so you're going to have to have one getter per data type. You could have three functions named the same that took in a dummy variable of the type you want returned, or that took pointers as parameters and returned the values that way, but neither of those options get you any closer to process(container->getValue()).

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