Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Java, there's a difference between a loop surrounded with a try-catch block if an exception could be thrown inside the while loop, and a statement surrounded by a try-catch block inside a loop.

For instance, the following code snippets are different:


Snippet 1:

try {
    for (File file : files) {
        FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file);
        System.out.println("OK!");
    }
}
catch (FileNotFoundException exc) {
    System.out.println("Error!");
}

^This code snippet breaks the loop if a FileNotFoundException is thrown. So if a file cannot be read, then the loop breaks and Java will stop reading further files.


Snippet 2:

for (File file : files) {
    try {
        FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file);
        System.out.println("OK!");
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException exc) {
        System.out.println("Error!");
    }
}

^This code snippet does not break the loop if an exception is thrown, if an exception occurs, the code catches the exception and continues to the next element in files. With other words, it won't stop reading the files.


Now I want to read a certain file in a directory (say bananas.xml), and, unregarded if that file is readable or not—the XML file is a metadata file, which might not be required for the program to run—, read the corresponding directory (which is bananas):

File main = new File("/home/MCEmperor/test");
File fruitMeta = new File(main, "bananas.xml");
FileInputStream fruitInputStream = new FileInputStream(fruitMeta); // This code COULD throw a FileNotFoundException
// Do something with the fruitInputStream...

File fruitDir = new File(main, "bananas");
if (fruitDir.exists() && fruitDir.canRead()) {
    File[] listBananas = fruitDir.listFiles();
    for (File file : listBananas) {
        FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file); // This code COULD throws a FileNotFoundException
        // Do something with the fis...
    }
}

Now two lines in the snippet above may throw a FileNotFoundException and I don't want to break the loop.

Now is there a way to make one try-catch block with catches both lines if an exception is thrown, but without breaking the for-loop?

share|improve this question
2  
I don't think that's possible. Why not just use two different try-catch blocks? –  nullptr May 2 '13 at 20:31
2  
Just a pet peeve of mine for exceptions in general, but you are using an exception for something that you are expecting. That doesn't sound like an exception to me, but a good case for an if(!exists){continue}. –  Maple May 2 '13 at 20:35
    
There are several reasons why a FileNotFoundException is thrown; in Windows, this exception is also thrown when the file is not accessible, for some strange reason. –  MC Emperor May 2 '13 at 20:39
    
What loop? If you mean the for (File... loop, why would you even enter that if fruitDir wasn't found? –  Hot Licks May 2 '13 at 20:44
    
@HotLicks fruitMeta is the one that wasn't found. –  Lone nebula May 2 '13 at 20:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about something like this?

FileInputStream fruitInputStream = getFileInputStream(fruitMeta);
...
fis = getFileInputStream(file);

private static FileInputStream getFileInputStream(File file) {
    try {
        return new FileInputStream(file);
    catch(FileNotFoundException e) {
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Edited away an unsafe alternative solution. –  Lone nebula May 2 '13 at 20:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.