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This question already has an answer here:

In a module, should I use one, two, or no underscores to denote a helper function the user should not call?

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marked as duplicate by Bi Rico, plaes, TerryA, Bakuriu, Lukas Graf Mar 4 '14 at 20:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Good description of single and double underscores here, stackoverflow.com/questions/1301346/… – Bi Rico May 2 '13 at 21:47
up vote 4 down vote accepted

PEP-8, the Python Style Guide, suggests a single leading underscore.

The following special forms using leading or trailing underscores are recognized (these can generally be combined with any case convention):

  • _single_leading_underscore: weak "internal use" indicator. E.g. from M import * does not import objects whose name starts with an underscore.
  • ...
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Probably a single underscore, but it depends on the situation.

Specifically, the Python Style Guide (PEP 8) says:

_single_leading_underscore: weak "internal use" indicator. E.g. from M import * does not import objects whose name starts with an underscore.

__double_leading_underscore: when naming a class attribute, invokes name mangling (inside class FooBar, __boo becomes FooBar_boo; see below).

See also this question for some much longer answers: The meaning of a single- and a double-underscore before an object name in Python

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What particularly does double underscore do in a module? Anything different from single underscore? – MarJamRob May 2 '13 at 21:49
    
Yes, when it's part of a class - it triggers name mangling. See the docs for a full explanation: docs.python.org/2/tutorial/… – Peter DeGlopper May 2 '13 at 21:53
1  
Broadly speaking, you use it mostly to prevent subclasses from trivially overriding the method. – Peter DeGlopper May 2 '13 at 21:53

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