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I have a function that is like the following

string Foo(bool A, bool B)
{
    if(A)
    {
        if(B)
        {
            return "W";
        }
        else
        {
            return "X";
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if(B)
        {
            return "Y";
        }
        else
        {
            return "Z";
        }
    }
}

That double nesting just feels wrong to me. Is there a better way to implement this pattern?


Thank you everyone for helping, I end up going with the trinary route. It helped turn this:

if (female)
{
    if (nutered)
    {
        destRow["TargetSex"] = "FS";
    }
    else
    {
        destRow["TargetSex"] = "F";
    }
}
else
{
    if (nutered)
    {
        destRow["TargetSex"] = "MN";
    }
    else
    {
        destRow["TargetSex"] = "M";
    }
}

in to this

destRow["TargetSex"] = female ? (nutered ? "FS" : "F")
                              : (nutered ? "MN" : "M");
share|improve this question
    
There's always if(A && B) { } else if (B) { } else { } –  David Starkey May 2 '13 at 22:17
    
@DavidStarkey There are 4 possible result states, you only return 3. –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 22:18
    
Then if(A && B) { } else if (!A && B) { } else if (B) { } else { } –  David Starkey May 2 '13 at 22:19
    
@DavidStarkey: Which of course should read: if(A && B) { } else if (A) { } else if (B) { } else { }. –  Pieter Geerkens May 2 '13 at 22:25
    
@Pieter Geerkens Of course :) Thanks for catching that. –  David Starkey May 2 '13 at 22:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted
if (A)
{
    return B ? "W" : "X";
}
return B ? "Y" : "Z";

Or even more terse:

return A ? (B ? "W" : "X")  
         : (B ? "Y" : "Z");

If your going for exclusively unnested conditions:

if (A && B) return "W";
if (A && !B) return "X";
return B ? "Y" : "Z";
share|improve this answer
2  
Can even do return A ? (B ? "W" : "X") : (B ? "Y": "Z"). –  Yorye Nathan May 2 '13 at 22:18
    
@Yorye That loses a bit of readability for me (personally), and might be overdoing it. –  doppelgreener May 2 '13 at 22:22
2  
The "even more terse" solution is the one I like most. –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 22:24
2  
When using the even more terse version, I like to put the colon from the end of the first line right under the question mark after the 'A'. To my eye that scans best of the various placement options. –  Pieter Geerkens May 2 '13 at 22:29
    
@PieterGeerkens see my updated question, I included the real version and how I did it, I did exactly what you suggested already :) –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 22:30

Logically, no. You have 4 distinct conditions for two variables.

You can make the code more concise, though:

string Foo(bool A, bool B)
{
    return A ? 
      B ? "W" : "X"
        :
      B ? "Y" : "Z";

}

Or if you're feeling particularly evil, put it on one line with no parens!:

return A?B?"W":"X":B?"Y":"Z";
share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for better conciseness, I knew there is no logic simplification. –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 22:19
1  
Those two are tied for the ugliest options I can think of! Do you wear striped ties with your plaid jackets also? +1 for the courage to post those two. –  Pieter Geerkens May 2 '13 at 22:32
    
@PieterGeerkens to be fair, he was the first one to post a trianary solution, steaks posted his in later as a edit. –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 22:33

You four possible states. A shorter (though not necessarily easier-to-maintain) representation would be

if (A && B) {
    return "W";
} else if (A && !B) {
    return "X";
} else if (!A && B) {
    return "Y";
else return "Z";
share|improve this answer

I just have to throw this in for fun:

    string Foo(bool A, bool B)
    {
        var labels = new[]{"W", "X", "Y", "Z"};
        return labels[(A ? 0 : 2) + (B ? 0 : 1)];
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Clever, When I was originally trying to think of better ways to do it I was actually thought about a similar idea but using a switch statement instead of an array :). –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 22:41

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