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I have a C# program that is constantly checking for new additions to an online DB. I have this code to have it check every 10 seconds

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        boolean run = true;
        while (run)
        {
            DBConnect Db = new DBConnect();

            // do amazing awesome mind blowing cool stuff

            Db.closeConnection();

            // wait for 10 seconds
            int wait = 10 * 1000;
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(wait);
        }
    }

i have error reporting that posts to the DB and if a major error occurs the program shuts down. Outside of the specific errors within my function, is this method secure and efficient?

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1  
What is your definition of "Secure" and "Efficient"? –  Pete Baughman May 2 '13 at 22:42
    
What makes you think any different? –  Ash Burlaczenko May 2 '13 at 22:42
    
Efficient = not using unnecessary resources, secure = stable program for constant operation @PeteBaughman –  Dan May 2 '13 at 22:43
2  
This sounds like a good case for using Sql Dependency msdn.microsoft.com/en-CA/library/a52dhwx7(v=vs.80).aspx –  Justin Bicknell May 2 '13 at 22:46
1  
Also you can run a timer instead of a thread sleep, it's a minor thing though. –  oleksii May 2 '13 at 22:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should rewrite your program as a windows service, that way you do not need to rely on a user to be logged for your program to run.

If you do go with the service route, I would swap out the infinite loop for a timer.

public partial class Service1 : ServiceBase
{
    public Service1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        int wait = 10 * 1000;
        timer = new Timer(wait);
    }

    private System.Timers.Timer timer;

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
        timer.Start();

    }

    void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            timer.Stop();
            try
            {
                DBConnect Db = new DBConnect())

                // do amazing awesome mind blowing cool stuff
            }
            finally
            {
                Db.closeConnection(); //We put this in a finally block so it will still happen, even if an exception is thrown.
            }
            timer.Start();
         }
         catch(SomeNonCriticalException ex)
         {
             MyExecptionLogger.Log(ex, Level.Waring); //Log the exception so you know what went wrong
             timer.Start(); //Start the timer for the next loop
         }
         catch(Exception ex)
         {
             MyExecptionLogger.Log(ex, Level.Critical); //Log the exception so you know what went wrong
             this.Stop(); //Stop the service
         }
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
        timer.Stop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
very cool, so a windows service essentially runs in background regardless of which user is logged? like svchost? –  Dan May 2 '13 at 22:47
2  
Yes, that is the definition of a service –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 22:47
    
very simple and effective, thank you for taking the time to enlighten me! –  Dan May 2 '13 at 22:54
1  
@Dan You want to handle what your program does in situations where stuff goes wrong. I updated my code to log to a fictitious function then stop the service when an exception is thrown. –  Scott Chamberlain May 2 '13 at 23:06

Write it as a console program without the wait and set up a scheduled task to run it periodically. You want to run it every 10 seconds? Every minute? Just change the scheduled task.

You can use the Task Scheduler GUI, or the schtasks command line tool.

See Programs are not cats.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh man, this is a great alternative as well - i don't know which answer to pick! –  Dan May 2 '13 at 22:52
1  
What's the thing about cats? :) Also a good alternative, vote up –  Luis Filipe May 2 '13 at 23:19

I would setup a windows service and use SqlDependency http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-CA/library/a52dhwx7(v=vs.80).aspx. That way when a change (which you specify) occurs in the database, it will trigger the OnChange event which you specify to do whatever it is you need to do. See the link for implementation details.

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