Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

While deleting an SSLSocket after a successful connection is made and used I am getting an access violation

Unhandled exception at 0x770f32d0 in Application_client_example.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0x00000dd3c0c76c48.

The access violation is coming from this part of the boost code:

engine::~engine()
{
  if (SSL_get_app_data(ssl_))
  {
    delete static_cast<verify_callback_base*>(SSL_get_app_data(ssl_));
    SSL_set_app_data(ssl_, 0);
  }

  ::BIO_free(ext_bio_);
  ::SSL_free(ssl_);
}

This code worked in boost version 1.47. The only changes I have made is I updated the boost libraries to the current version 1.53 and built a 64 bit version of the library and exe.

Here is the SSL connection that is created and deleted:

// Connect 
    SSLSocket* socket = new SSLSocket();

    if ((errorCode = socket->connect((char*)server.c_str(), (char*)port.c_str())) != 0) 
    {
        Logger::log(log4cpp::Priority::FATAL, "Secure Socket Error");

        return errorCode;
    }    

    delete socket

Here is the SSLSocket destructor

SSLSocket::~SSLSocket(void)
{
    try {
        sslSocket->shutdown();
        delete sslSocket;
    }
    catch (std::exception& e)
    {
        std::string exception(e.what());
        Logger::log(log4cpp::Priority::FATAL, "[SSLSocket] Error deleting sslSocket. Exception: " + exception);
    }

}

Here is the def for SSLSocket. SSLSocket is essentially just a wrapper class for the ssl socket:

#ifndef __SSLSOCKET__
#define __SSLSOCKET__

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/array.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/ssl.hpp>
#include <string>

#include "Logger.h"
#include "Config.h"

using namespace boost::asio;

class SSLSocket
{
private:
    io_service io_service;
    ssl::stream<ip::tcp::socket>* sslSocket;

public:
    SSLSocket(void);
    ~SSLSocket(void);

    DWORD connect(char* remoteServer, char* remotePort);
    DWORD sendString(std::string data);
    std::string receiveString(void);
};

#endif
share|improve this question
    
This doesn't look like it uses Asio, is SSLSocket a typedef? – Sam Miller May 2 '13 at 23:46
    
Yes. Sorry here is the relevant code: – Oros May 2 '13 at 23:53
    
Please update your question with the definition of SSLSocket, its destructor is not enough – Sam Miller May 3 '13 at 0:07
    
I added the class def for SSLSocket. Let me know if you want me to add anything else. I keep running debug on it but I can't really tell what is going on inside boost. – Oros May 3 '13 at 1:00

Here is my code that I use to shut down the socket connection in my SSLSockets class, which is also a wrapper around ASIO for an SSL connection. I am using Boost ASIO version 1.52 for Windows with 32 bit libraries. I too used to receive an exception when shutting down the socket until I discovered how to do it properly:

void SSLSocket::Stop()
{
   // This method calls the shutdown method on the socket in order to stop reads or writes that might be going on.  If this is not done, then an exception will be thrown
   // when it comes time to delete this object.
   //
   boost::system::error_code EC;
   try
   {
      // This method can be called from the handler as well.  So once the ShuttingDown flag is set, don't go throught the same code again.
      if (ShuttingDown)
         return;
      LockCode->Acquire(); // Single thread the code.
      // Only do this once.
      if (!ShuttingDown)
      {
         ShuttingDown = true;
         pSocket->next_layer().cancel();
         pSocket->shutdown(EC);
         // Note that EC will usually have an error condition, but it does not seem to be a problem.
         delete pSocket;
         pSocket = 0;
         ReqAlive = false;
         SetEvent(hEvent);
         IOService->stop();
         LobbySocketOpen = false;
         // Wait until the 2 threads have exited before returning.
         WorkerThreads.join_all();
      }
      LockCode->Release();
      delete LockCode;
      LockCode = 0;
   }
   catch (std::exception& e)
   {
      stringstream ss;
      ss << "SSLSocket::Stop: threw an error - " << e.what() << ".\n";
      Log.LogString(ss.str(), LogError);
      Stop();
   }
}

In answer to question about the Lock variable

Lock is a class that encapsulates a critical section (specific to Microsoft) so that the code can be single threaded. Here is the definition for it:

class Lock
{
public:
   Lock()
   {
      ::InitializeCriticalSection(&CS);
   }

   ~Lock()
   {
      ::DeleteCriticalSection(&CS);
   }

   void Acquire()
   {
      ::EnterCriticalSection(&CS);
   }

   void Release()
   {
      ::LeaveCriticalSection(&CS);
   }

private:
   Lock(const Lock&);
   Lock& operator=(const Lock&);
   CRITICAL_SECTION CS;
};

Socket Creation Code

This is the code I use to create the SSL context object and SSL socket object:

void SSLSocket::Connect(SSLSocket* psSLS, const string& serverPath, string& port)
{
   // Connects to the server.
   // serverPath - specifies the path to the server.  Can be either an ip address or url.
   // port - port server is listening on.
   //
   try
   {
      LockCode->Acquire(); // Single thread the code.
      // If the user has tried to connect before, then make sure everything is clean before trying to do so again.
      if (pSocket)
      {
         delete pSocket;
         pSocket = 0;
      }                                                                                                  
      // If serverPath is a URL, then resolve the address.
      if ((serverPath[0] < '0') || (serverPath[0] > '9')) // Assumes that the first char of the server path is not a number when resolving to an ip addr.
      {
         // Create the resolver and query objects to resolve the host name in serverPath to an ip address.
         boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver resolver(*IOService);
         boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::query query(serverPath, port);
         boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator EndpointIterator = resolver.resolve(query);
         // Set up an SSL context.
         boost::asio::ssl::context ctx(*IOService, boost::asio::ssl::context::tlsv1_client);
         // Specify to not verify the server certificiate right now.
         ctx.set_verify_mode(boost::asio::ssl::context::verify_none);
         // Init the socket object used to initially communicate with the server.
         pSocket = new boost::asio::ssl::stream<boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket>(*IOService, ctx);
         //
         // The thread we are on now, is most likely the user interface thread.  Create a thread to handle all incoming socket work messages.
         // Only one thread is created to handle the socket I/O reading and another thread is created to handle writing.
         if (!RcvThreadCreated)
         {
            WorkerThreads.create_thread(boost::bind(&SSLSocket::RcvWorkerThread, this));
            RcvThreadCreated = true;
            WorkerThreads.create_thread(boost::bind(&SSLSocket::SendWorkerThread, this));
         }
         // Try to connect to the server.  Note - add timeout logic at some point.
         boost::asio::async_connect(pSocket->lowest_layer(), EndpointIterator,
            boost::bind(&SSLSocket::HandleConnect, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error));
      }
      else
      {
         // serverPath is an ip address, so try to connect using that.
         //
         stringstream ss1;
         boost::system::error_code EC;
         ss1 << "SSLSocket::Connect: Preparing to connect to game server " << serverPath << " : " << port << ".\n";
         Log.LogString(ss1.str(), LogInfo);
         // Create an endpoint with the specified ip address.
         const boost::asio::ip::address IP(boost::asio::ip::address::from_string(serverPath));
         int iport = atoi(port.c_str());
         const boost::asio::ip::tcp::endpoint EP(IP, iport);
         // Set up an SSL context.
         boost::asio::ssl::context ctx(*IOService, boost::asio::ssl::context::tlsv1_client);
         // Specify to not verify the server certificiate right now.
         ctx.set_verify_mode(boost::asio::ssl::context::verify_none);
         // Init the socket object used to initially communicate with the server.
         pSocket = new boost::asio::ssl::stream<boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket>(*IOService, ctx);
         //
         // Try to connect to the server.  Note - add timeout logic at some point.
         pSocket->next_layer().connect(EP, EC);
         if (EC)
         {
            // Log an error.  This worker thread should exit gracefully after this.
            stringstream ss;
            ss << "SSLSocket::Connect: connect failed to " << sClientIp << " : " << uiClientPort << ".  Error: " << EC.message() + ".\n";
            Log.LogString(ss.str(), LogError);
         }
         stringstream ss;
         ss << "SSLSocket::Connect: Calling HandleConnect for game server " << serverPath << " : " << port << ".\n";
         Log.LogString(ss.str(), LogInfo);
         HandleConnect(EC);
      }
   }
   catch (std::exception& e)
   {
      stringstream ss;
      ss << "SSLSocket::Connect: threw an error - " << e.what() << ".\n";
      Log.LogString(ss.str(), LogError);
      Stop();
   }
   LockCode->Release();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I will do something similar. What is the LockCode variable? – Oros May 3 '13 at 19:55
    
I added the class definition for Lock to my answer. – Bob Bryan May 3 '13 at 23:47
    
I tried adding this class and the code that you suggested but I am still having the same problem. – Oros May 8 '13 at 22:45
    
Do you know what line in engine::~engine() is throwing the exception? If not, then try setting a breakpoint at the top of the method and step through it until you find the line that throws the exception. – Bob Bryan May 9 '13 at 2:56
    
It is throwing the access violation when I step into code::SSL_free(ssl_); – Oros May 9 '13 at 21:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok so the fix for this after searching around and not really finding anything related was that I was building all the boost libraries as MTd. I was assuming that I would use the MTd build for OpenSSL libraries but come to find out if you use the non MT Openssl libraries it works just fine.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.