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Consider the following makefile:

foo :
    mkdir foo

foo/a.out : foo a.in
    cp a.in foo/a.out

foo/b.out : foo b.in
    cp b.in foo/b.out

and the following interaction with it, starting from a directory that contains files a.in and b.in and nothing else:

$ make foo/a.out
mkdir foo
cp a.in foo/a.out

So far, so good.

$ make foo/b.out
cp b.in foo/b.out

Still good, but now:

$ make foo/a.out   # a.out should be up to date now!
cp a.in foo/a.out

It rebuilds the a.out target, even though none of its prerequisites have changed.

It seems like what's happening is that when foo/b.out is created, the last modification time of the directory foo is updated, so it picks that up as having "changed".

Is there a way to avoid this? For example, is there a way to declare that foo/a.out depends on foo only in that foo has to exist, and the creating of files inside foo doesn't cause foo to be considered out of date?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As an authority on Make recently pointed out:

"The one thing you must NEVER do is use a directory as a simple prerequisite. The rules the filesystem uses to update the modified time on directories do not work well with make."

But I think this will do what you want:

foo :
    mkdir foo

foo/a.out : a.in | foo
    cp a.in foo/a.out

foo/b.out : b.in | foo
    cp b.in foo/b.out
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1  
+1 didn't know about this feature, but note that it's only available in newish versions of GNU Make. –  tripleee May 3 '13 at 5:47
    
Err... for some definition of "newish" I guess. Order-only prerequisites were added in GNU make 3.80 which was released over 10 years ago, in Oct 2002. –  MadScientist May 3 '13 at 11:57

I like @Beta's answer, but it is not portable. For a simple portable workaround, create a sentinel file when you create the directory, and depend on the sentinel file instead.

foo/.dir:
        mkdir -p foo
        touch $@
foo/a.out: a.in foo/.dir
        cp $< $@
foo/b.out: b.in foo/.dir
        cp $< $@

This can be further simplified with a pattern rule:

foo/%.out: %.in foo/.dir
        cp $< $@
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Instead of making the targets dependent on the directory, you can simply create the directory unconditionally in their build rules:

foo/a.out: a.in
        mkdir -p foo
        cp a.in foo/a.out

foo/b.out: b.in
        mkdir -p foo
        cp b.in foo/b.out

This avoids problems with using a directory as a prerequisite.

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This requires repeating the mkdir command each time. –  HighCommander4 May 3 '13 at 1:49
    
@HighCommander4 True, although in practice I'd expect to use a pattern-based rule for this rather than individual rules for each target. I'd recommend the other answer if your version of make supports it. See also the question that Beta linked to, which has some more discussion of this issue. –  Bradd Szonye May 3 '13 at 1:57
    
Consider the slightly modified scenario where the .in files are also in foo, and there is another directory bar similar to foo. Say my pattern-based rule is %.out : %.in (with the actions omitted), and then I have rules foo/% : foo and bar/% : bar with no actions to get the directory prerequisites in place. What do I mkdir in the body of the %.out : %.in rule? –  HighCommander4 May 3 '13 at 2:32
    
@HighCommander4 I'm having a hard time picturing this. How do the %.in files exist if the directory doesn't? –  Bradd Szonye May 3 '13 at 6:05
2  
@HighCommander4, you should always mkdir -p $(@D). The $(@D) automatic variable gives the directory of the target ($@). Use the -p option so it won't fail if the directory already exists. –  MadScientist May 3 '13 at 11:55

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