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I need to call a stored procedure, give it a report id (int) and have it update a report table with a confirmation number (varchar) (confirmation # generated in the stored procedure) and return the confirmation number (i will need it to return it to a web service/website).

My stored procedure code:

DECLARE PROCEDURE [dbo].[spUpdateConfirmation]
@ReportID int
AS
BEGIN
   Declare @Confirmation varchar(30) = replace(replace(replace(convert(varchar(16),CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,120),'-',''),' ',''),':','')+convert(varchar(24),@ReportID)
   PRINT @Confirmation

   UPDATE Report
   SET  Confirmation = @Confirmation
   WHERE ReportID = @ReportID;

   RETURN @Confirmation
END

My call to the stored procedure:

execute [spUpdateConfirmation] 2

I confirmed in the table the value was inserted but I get this error message:

2013050219072

(1 row(s) affected)

Msg 248, Level 16, State 1, Procedure spUpdateConfirmation, Line 12
The conversion of the varchar value '2013050219072' overflowed an int column.
The 'spUpdateConfirmation' procedure attempted to return a status of NULL, which is not allowed. A status of 0 will be returned instead.

Question: What did I do wrong?

I understand what overflow is, the value is too large for an int, but I used the convert to varchar, inserted to table column type varchar(30)

I also tested this statement in SQL and it works fine:

print replace(replace(replace(convert(varchar(16),CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,120),'-',''),' ',''),':','')+convert(varchar(24),2)

It returns: 2013050219162

share|improve this question
    
The error message is pretty self explanatory... –  Kermit May 3 '13 at 2:17
    
@FreshPrinceOfSO I am converting a date value to a varchar, I dont know where the conversion to an int column comes into play... I edited my post also to show a simple PRINT of the same thing works –  Kairan May 3 '13 at 2:20
    
Its just a warning not an error. –  Santosh May 3 '13 at 2:21
    
@Kairan Aren't you trying to convert @ReportID int? –  Kermit May 3 '13 at 2:22
    
@FreshPrinceOfSO I think RichardTheKiwi provided the answer, the Return statement per msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174998.aspx says it returns an int, so it casts the varchar to a int –  Kairan May 3 '13 at 2:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

RETURN from a stored procedure only allows integer values. Specifically, the documentation states:

RETURN [ integer_expression ]

If you want to return a varchar value, you can use an output parameter

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[spUpdateConfirmation]
@ReportID int, @Confirmation varchar(30) output
AS
--BEGIN
SET @Confirmation = replace(replace(replace(convert(varchar(16),CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,120),'-',''),' ',''),':','')+convert(varchar(24),@ReportID)
--PRINT @Confirmation
    UPDATE Report
    SET  Confirmation = @Confirmation
    WHERE ReportID = @ReportID;
    --RETURN @Confirmation
--END
GO

To be called like this

declare @reportID int; -- set @reportID
declare @confirmation varchar(30);
exec [dbo].[spUpdateConfirmation] @reportID, @confirmation output;
-- @confirmation now contains the value set from the SP call above

A simpler option if you are calling this from C# is to SELECT the output as a single-row, single-column result and use SqlCommand.ExecuteScalar, e.g.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[spUpdateConfirmation]
@ReportID int
AS
--BEGIN
DECLARE @Confirmation varchar(30);
SET @Confirmation = replace(replace(replace(convert(varchar(16),CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,120),'-',''),' ',''),':','')+convert(varchar(24),@ReportID)
--PRINT @Confirmation
    SET NOCOUNT ON; -- prevent rowcount messages
    UPDATE Report
    SET  Confirmation = @Confirmation
    WHERE ReportID = @ReportID;
    --RETURN @Confirmation
    SET NOCOUNT OFF; -- re-enable for the following select
    SELECT @Confirmation;   -- this is the value you get
--END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
I dont know where the conversion to an int column comes into play Because RETURN expects an INT, it attempts to implicitly cast RETURN @confirmation to an INT. SQL Server does a lot of implicit casts all the time –  RichardTheKiwi May 3 '13 at 2:25
    
Ahh, I just thought of that and saw that MS page on the Return value being an int: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174998.aspx –  Kairan May 3 '13 at 2:25

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