Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a Python program that employs multiprocessing via subclassed Process objects. I am currently trying to improve the error handling, but it is causing me no end of frustration for reasons I cannot comprehend.

Bear with me while I lay out some sample code:

My subclassed Process worker:

# worker.py

from multiprocessing import Process, Queue
import sys
import traceback
# other imports as necessary

class Worker(Process):
    def __init__(self, inputQueue, outputQueue):
        try:
            super(Worker, self).__init__()

            self.inputQueue = inputQueue
            self.outputQueue = outputQueue

            #etc

            1/0 # dumb error that causes the process to crash

            #etc

         except Exception as e:
             exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback = sys.exc_info()
             e = traceback.format_exception(exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback, limit = 2)

             # Forward the error message to the Engine class
             self.outputQueue.put({ 'type' : 'error', 'data' : e })

    def run(self):
        try:
            for i in iter(self.inputQueue.get, 'STOP'):
                # Do stuff
                self.outputQueue.put({ 'type' : 'result', 'data' : stuff })

        except Exception as e:
            exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback = sys.exc_info()
            e = traceback.format_exception(exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback, limit = 2)

            # Forward the error message to the Engine class
            self.outputQueue.put({ 'type' : 'error', 'data' : e })

This is my Engine class that is the parent of the Worker objects:

# engine.py
# imports as necessary
class Engine:
    def __init__(self) # Other arguments as necessary
        # Initialise the class
        self.processors = []
    def run(self):
        try:
            # Fill the inputQueue with a number of jobs
            # and initialise the output queue

            # etc

            # Start the Worker processes
            for i in range(numberOfProcesses):
                p = worker.Worker(inputQueue, outputQueue)
                self.processors.append(p)
                p.start()
                inputQueue.put('STOP')

            # Process outputQueue
            numberOfJobs = 6 # (say)

            while numberOfJobs:
                result = outputQueue.get()

                if result['type'] == 'error':
                    print result
                    raise Exception

                elif result['type'] == 'result':
                    # Process result appropriately
                    numberOfJobs -= 1

            for p in self.processors:
                p.join()

        except Exception as e:
            raise

Configuration file that runs the whole thing:

# configuration.py
if __name__ == "__main__":
    # Initialise other parameters as necessary

    try:
        # Initialise an instance of engine.Engine
        eng = engine.Engine(arguments as necessary)

        eng.run()

    except Exception as e:
        print e
        print 'Finished UNSUCCESSFULLY.'

    else:
        print 'Finished SUCCESSFULLY.'

For brevity, I left a few imports and other things out of the example code. The error handling machinery in worker.py is derived from my earlier question here.

When I run the program, the worker processes execute and when one hits the 1/0 error in Worker.__init__ (or in Worker.run(), if there was one in there), it grabs the traceback and puts it into the output queue just fine. Engine.run() prints the error message as it's supposed to. The problem is that is where it all ends. Engine should raise a new, generic, error and (I think) pass it up to the code in configuration.py, whereupon the program should exit via the except statement in that file (printing a message that says 'Finished UNSUCCESSFULLY').

Instead, what actually happens is that Engine.run() prints the error message derived from the Worker class, then the program simply hangs and CPU usage drops to 0%. Nothing else happens. I recognise that this is most likely a problem with the other Worker processes not quitting (or whatever they ought to do).

What mystifies me is that if I don't have the except Exception as e block in the Engine class, and if I don't have the try-except-else blocks in the configuration.py file, Engine.run() prints the traceback from the Worker object and then crashes properly (doesn't hang) with the generic raise Exception statement.

Essentially what I'd like to do is get Engine.run() to pass the generic raise Exception up to the configuration file so that the program exits more gracefully.

Someone help me!

share|improve this question
    
so p.join() hangs, right? –  User May 3 '13 at 11:04
    
Well, I guess so. –  npo May 4 '13 at 12:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.