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my Linq To Sql model contains some entites that cause the generated Sql code to be LEFT OUTER JOINS. this is correct, because of how the tables are modelled.

BUT, for a particular query, I actually know the results will always exist in the child table. As such, I was hoping to change the SQL from a LEFT OUTER JOIN to an INNER JOIN.

Ok. so i thought i might MANUALLY specify the joins. eg.

from q in db.Foo
join a in db.Bar on q.Id equals a.Id
select q

Now, when I check out the sql statemement the Linq generates, it contains BOTH the INNER JOIN (which i made, above) and the LEFT OUTER JOIN!

How can i override the default join behavior so only what I define in my linq statement, is what is used/goes/is the law?

cheers :)

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1 Answer 1

With the sample query you have posted above it should not do any joins besides a single join between Foo and Bar.

Are you by any chance doing something along the lines of:

from q in db.Foo
join a in db.Bar on q.Id equals a.Id
select new { q.SomeField, q.Bar.SomeOtherField }

If so, change that to:

from q in db.Foo
join a in db.Bar on q.Id equals a.Id
select new { q.SomeField, a.SomeOtherField }
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Hi KristoferA :) Er, I'm not sure why the second block would have a different join result? Also, ou would think that, if I specify the join, then it would override the default join mapping .. right? –  Pure.Krome Oct 28 '09 at 11:14
    
Nope, a query can join to the same table multiple times. The first query has one explicit join (a) and one implicit join (through the q.Bar.SomeOtherField reference). If it tried to automatically 'map' joins, all kinds of funny side effects could occur. –  KristoferA Oct 28 '09 at 11:26

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