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What is the difference between the following two declarations?

Class.method = function () { /* code */ }
Class.prototype.method = function () { /* code using this.values */ }

Is it okay to think of the first statement as a declaration of a static method, and the second statement as a declaration of an instance method?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 501 down vote accepted

Yes, the first function has no relationship with an object instance of that constructor function, you can consider it like a 'static method'.

In JavaScript functions are first-class objects, that means you can treat them just like any object, in this case, you are only adding a property to the function object.

The second function, as you are extending the constructor function prototype, it will be available to all the object instances created with the new keyword, and the context within that function (the this keyword) will refer to the actual object instance where you call it.

Consider this example:

// constructor function
function MyClass () {
  var privateVariable; // private member only available within the constructor fn

  this.privilegedMethod = function () { // it can access private members

// A 'static method', it's just like a normal function 
// it has no relation with any 'MyClass' object instance
MyClass.staticMethod = function () {};

MyClass.prototype.publicMethod = function () {
  // the 'this' keyword refers to the object instance
  // you can access only 'privileged' and 'public' members

var myObj = new MyClass(); // new object instance

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nice explaination – andrerpena Nov 27 '09 at 21:18
Thank you @André! – CMS Nov 27 '09 at 21:22
As always, thanks for his explanation, it is really comprehensible. – Tarik Dec 7 '09 at 1:40
This was taken from:… It's also important to say that if we are creating many instances of MyClass, we are creating for each instance a function privilegedMethod. However publicMethod is only constructed once for all instances created. – Menda Jan 16 '12 at 23:39
Here's an updated link to the article mentioned in Menda's comment: – Gray Spectrum Jun 13 '14 at 14:03

When you create more than one instance of MyClass , you will still only have only one instance of publicMethod in memory but in case of privilegedMethod you will end up creating lots of instances and staticMethod has no relationship with an object instance.

That's why prototypes save memory.

Also, if you change the parent object's properties, is the child's corresponding property hasn't been changed, it'll be updated.

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