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I have an array of elements and need to remove certain ones from it. The problem is that JavaScript doesn't seem to have a for each loop and if I use a for loop I run into problems with it basically trying to check elements beyond the bounds of the array, or missing elements in the array because the indexes change. Let me show you what I mean:

var elements = [1, 5, 5, 3, 5, 2, 4];
for(var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++){
    if(elements[i] == 5){
        elements.splice(i, 1);
    }
}

The problem is that when elements[1] is removed, elements[2] becomes elements[1]. So first problem is that some elements are never examined. The other problem is that .length changes and if I hard code the bounds, then I might be trying to examine elements beyond the bounds of the array. So what's the best way to do this incredibly simple thing?

share|improve this question
1  
elements.splice(i--, 1); –  Dagg Nabbit May 3 '13 at 6:37
    
I don't like "--" or "++" syntax but a useful tip when starting from the beginning of the array +1 –  Xotic750 May 3 '13 at 6:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Start from the top!

var elements = [1, 5, 5, 3, 5, 2, 4];
for(var i = elements.length -1; i >= 0 ; i--){
    if(elements[i] == 5){
        elements.splice(i, 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for starting from the end to avoid skipping elements due to the changing length that the OP has mentioned. –  Xotic750 May 3 '13 at 6:21
2  
for (var i = elements.length; i--;) is probably the more common way to write it. –  Dagg Nabbit May 3 '13 at 6:34
    
@Dagg Nabbit, one thing to note with that shorthand is that it will throw errors in jslint, if you should use such a tool for static code analysis (and of course the "--"). –  Xotic750 May 3 '13 at 6:54
    
@Xotic750 yeah, jslint throws silly errors. =/ –  Dagg Nabbit May 3 '13 at 7:00

You could use the filter method here:

var elements = [1, 5, 5, 3, 5, 2, 4].filter(function(a){return a !== 5;});
//=> elements now [1,3,2,4]

Or if you don't want to touch elements:

var elementsfiltered
   ,elements = [1, 5, 5, 3, 5, 2, 4]
                .filter( function(a){if (a!==5) this.push(a); return true;},
                         elementsfiltered = [] );
   //=> elementsfiltered = [1,3,2,4], elements = [1, 5, 5, 3, 5, 2, 4]

See MDN documentation for filter

Alternatively you can extend the Array.prototype

Array.prototype.remove = Array.prototype.remove || function(val){
    var i = this.length;
    while(i--){
        if (this[i] === val){
            this.splice(i,1);
        }
    }
};
var elements = [1, 5, 5, 3, 5, 2, 4];
elements.remove(5);
//=> elements now [1,3,2,4]
share|improve this answer
1  
While creating a new array, which filter does, is not a bad suggestion as a solution, the OP does actually ask about removing elements inline and it would seem best to give an example of that. –  Xotic750 May 3 '13 at 6:20
1  
Seems like an unnecessary departure from the original code. OP could keep his existing code by decrementing i after the splice. –  Dagg Nabbit May 3 '13 at 6:41

This is an example of using Array.indexOf, while and Array.splice to remove elements inline.

var elements = [1, 5, 5, 3, 5, 2, 4];
var remove = 5;
var index = elements.indexOf(remove);

while (index !== -1) {
    elements.splice(index, 1);
    index = elements.indexOf(remove);
}

console.log(elements);

On jsfiddle

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downvoted for inefficient O(n^2) algorithm –  Alnitak Sep 25 at 13:23
    
I never made any claims on efficiency, and the question didn't concern that, but how you can deal with a changing array length when performing inline element removal. Here is a jsPerf so that you can give your efficient version as an answer and compare it with other answers posted. jsperf.com/soq-iterate-over-an-array-and-remove –  Xotic750 Sep 26 at 20:12
    
the canonical method of dealing with a changing array length is to start from the end of the array and work backwards. Alternatively it's possible to work forwards from the current position and not increment if you've removed the current element. Instead, your method starts over from the zeroth element every time a match is found, thereby repeatedly going over and over the same elements. It's a very poor algorithm and shouldn't ever be used. –  Alnitak Sep 27 at 6:45
1  
OK, that's weird - I tried that and (on this small sample set) it was substantially slower. I don't know why yet. jsperf.com/soq-iterate-over-an-array-and-remove/2 –  Alnitak Sep 28 at 6:58
1  
I changed the test case slightly - now the fromIndex case runs very slightly faster... jsperf.com/soq-iterate-over-an-array-and-remove/3 –  Alnitak Sep 29 at 17:39

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