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I'm learning C++ and i just have a small problem. I have a class which contains a vector<int>. From outside this vector<int> should be accessable, so it should be possible to add/remove/get its elements.

It should not be possible to override the object with a new instance. Here is such an example class (it's minimalized):

class MyClass
{
    public:
        vector<int>& vec() { return _vec; }
    private:
        vector<int> _vec;
};

E.g. the following code works:

MyClass x;
x.vec().push_back(0);
x.vec().push_back(7);
x.vec().push_back(9);
cout << c.vec().size() << endl;

But unfortunately the following code also works:

MyClass x;
x.vec() = vector<int>();

I like to disallow this, but i did only find the solution to return a pointer of type vector<int> *. But i learned pointers are 'evil' and i shouldn't use them directly, i have to use smart pointers. I think for this problem a smart pointer is useless, so i don't know how to solve this simple problem:-/

Or is just a simple pointer the cleanest solution?

best regards

Kevin

-edit-

In general i like to make something that can be used like the follwing C# class:

public class MyClass
{
    public List<int> List { get; private set; }

    public MyClass()
    {
        List = new List<int>();
    }
}

It's just an example and i just thought about how to make this in C++. Maybe i some cases i have much more complex classes than vector<int>/List<int> to include into other classes.

But maybe it is only possible to do this by defining own methods (=interface) to the internal object.

share|improve this question
    
Don't return a reference, and add a special function to add values? Having a public function returning a reference to a member variable, is like having the member variable itself public. –  Joachim Pileborg May 3 '13 at 6:53
    
Pointers aren't evil, but don't help here. You should hide the vector detail an provide the right interface to manipulate the data. –  hansmaad May 3 '13 at 6:54
    
if you want to expose all the methods of the vector, don't see any harm in exposing the assignment operator as well (in this case you could also inherit public from vector what would be simpler). if you want to have control and allow only some operators to be public hide the vector and write your own proxy functions –  Yuval May 3 '13 at 7:02
    
Ok, i see this solution, but if a class contains a more complex object than vector<int> and i like to give others the full access to this object then it's much work to (re-)implement the internal objects interface to the current class. E.g. in C# it's very easy to do this: class test{ public List<int> Lst { get; private set; } public test() { Lst = new List<int>(); } } –  Kevin Meier May 3 '13 at 7:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems wrong to me that the only acceptable solution is to provide forwarding functions for potentially all the methods in the vector class. So I would like to propose an alternative answer.

Create a small template class publically derived from vector that hides the operator= method by making it private.

template<class T>
class immutablevector : public vector<T>
{
  private:
    immutablevector &operator=(vector<T>);
};

Then in MyClass, wherever you would have used vector, use immutablevector instead.

class MyClass
{
  public:
    immutablevector<int>& vec() { return _vec; }
  private:
    immutablevector<int> _vec;
};

Now you can safely access all vector functionality via the vec method, but you won't be able to assign a new vector instance.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool solution;-) Thx –  Kevin Meier May 3 '13 at 22:00

You might want to consider using functions to only expose the functionality you need:

class MyClass
{
public:
    void push_back(int value) { _vec.push_back(value); }
    size_t size() { return _vec.size(); }

private:
    vector<int> _vec;
};

int main()
{
    MyClass x;
    x.push_back(0);
    x.push_back(7);
    x.push_back(9);
    cout << x.size() << endl;

    return 0;
}

Or alternatively just use a plain vector.

share|improve this answer

It's a bit strange how you use the private identifier. You set your vector<int> as private and then you create a public method that gives direct access to that variable.

You should instead create public methods get() and push_back()

class MyClass{
     private: vector<int> _vec;
     public: 
         vector<int> get(){ return _vec(); }
         void push_back(int x) { _vec.push_back(x); }
};

//this will work
MyClass x;
x.push_back(0);
x.push_back(7);
x.push_back(9);
cout<<x.get().size()<<endl;

Now there is not way you to directly modify the private variable vector<int> _vec. Keep in mind you will probably need to instantiate _vec in MyClass's constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
The public method to the private member vector array is not such a bad thing. It allows, for example, to add logging anytime an item is added to the array, in just one place in the code. –  Merlin069 May 3 '13 at 7:50
1  
That's true, but doesn't that defeat the purpose of private access specifier? –  dragos2 May 3 '13 at 8:59
    
No, because you're forcing access to go through the accessor function, which means you wouldn't then be able to bypass the logging if you wanted access to the member. –  Merlin069 May 3 '13 at 9:07
1  
Also, you might, for example, want to maintain a count of accesses to the object, which again means you want to force usage of the accessor function and keep the actual member private. –  Merlin069 May 3 '13 at 9:11
    
This is interesting. Never actually though of this. Thanks. –  dragos2 May 3 '13 at 9:15

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