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I have a long running function. Which iterates through a large array and performs a function within each loop.

longFunction : function(){
       var self = this;
       var data = self.data;

       for(var i=0; len = data.length; i<len; i++){
              self.smallFunction(i);
       }
},
smallFunction : function(index){

// Do Stuff!

}

For the most part this is fine but when I am dealing with arrays above around 1500 or so we get to the point of recieving a javascript execution alert message.

So I need to break this up. My first attempt is like so:

longFunction : function(index){
       var self = this;
       var data = self.data;


      self.smallFunction(index);

      if(data.slides[index+1){
         setTimeout(function(){
            self.longFunction(index+1);
         },0);
      }
      else {
               //WORK FINISHED
      }

},
smallFunction : function(index){

// Do Stuff!

}

So here I am removing the loop and introducing a self calling function which increases its index each iteration. To return control to the main UI thread in order to prevent the javascript execution warning method I have added a setTimeout to allow it time to update after each iteration. The problem is that with this method getting the actual work done takes quite literally 10 times longer. What appears to be happening is although the setTimeout is set to 0, it is actually waiting more like 10ms. which on large arrays builds up very quickly. Removing the setTimeout and letting longFunction call itself gives performance comparable to the original loop method.

I need another solution, one which has comparable performance to the loop but which does not cause a javascript execution warning. Unfortunately webWorkers cannot be used in this instance.

It is important to note that I do not need a fully responsive UI during this process. Just enough to update a progress bar every few seconds.

Would breaking it up into chunks of loops be an option? I.e. perform 500 iterations at a time, stop, timeout, update progress bar, perform next 500 etc.. etc..

Is there anything better?

ANSWER:

The only solution seems to be chunking the work.

By adding the following to my self calling function I am allowing the UI to update every 250 iterations:

 longFunction : function(index){
           var self = this;
           var data = self.data;


          self.smallFunction(index);

          var nextindex = i+1;

          if(data.slides[nextindex){
            if(nextindex % 250 === 0){
             setTimeout(function(){               
                self.longFunction(nextindex);
             },0);
            }
            else {
                self.longFunction(nextindex);
            }
          }
          else {
                   //WORK FINISHED
          }

    },
    smallFunction : function(index){

    // Do Stuff!

    }

All I am doing here is checking if the next index is divisble by 250, if it is then we use a timeout to allow the main UI thread to update. If not we call it again directly. Problem solved!

share|improve this question
    
Is it possible to run it asynchronously in the background? If you can't do that, yes, break it up into chunks. –  Patashu May 3 '13 at 6:53
    
What exactly your function is doing for each item? Maybe you can parallel them by executing multiple setTimeout at once. –  exebook May 3 '13 at 6:55
1  
@Patashu - web workers are not available yet in all browsers... So breaking into reasonable chunk looks like safe approach. –  Alexei Levenkov May 3 '13 at 6:55
3  
setTimeout has a minimal value of 4ms. And yes, breaking up the loops in chunks of 500 is the way to go. –  Bergi May 3 '13 at 6:58
1  
@gordyr - The iframes do take up a decent amount of overhead, it would seem that it takes up to 12 seconds to make 1000 of them. –  Travis J May 3 '13 at 7:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's some batching code modified from an earlier answer I had written:

var n = 0,
    max = data.length;
    batch = 100;

(function nextBatch() {
    for (var i = 0; i < batch && n < max; ++i, ++n) {
        myFunc(n);
    }
    if (n < max) {
        setTimeout(nextBatch, 0);
    }
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Both your method and the one I just added into my question work perfectly. I would expect yours to be slightly faster as it is avoiding function overhead. Thanks alnitak. –  gordyr May 3 '13 at 7:17

Actually 1500 timeouts is nothing, so you can simply do this:

var i1 = 0
for (var i = 0; i < 1500; i++) setTimeout(function() { doSomething(i1++) }, 0)

System will queue the timeout events for you and they will be called immediately one after another. And if users click anything during execution, they will not notice any lag. And no "script is running too long" thing.

From my experiments V8 can create 500,000 timeouts per second.

share|improve this answer
    
While thats correct it slows everything down massively since we are using a timeout for each iteration. In most browsers a 0 timeout actually equals around 10ms meaning that for a 2000 long set of processes we are adding 20 seconds on to the load time that is not needed. The solutions we have come up with only runs the timeout at a specified interval allowing the others to fire instantly. –  gordyr May 3 '13 at 8:17
    
I am quite sure you do not understand this solution. setTimeouts will start all together at same time. Few ms will elapse before the first of them start executing. But others will follow it without any delay. You will not get 20 second extra. –  exebook May 3 '13 at 9:07
    
when I said 1500 timeouts is nothing, I did not mean that 1500*10ms is not that much. I mean V8 can easily hold a queue of pending thousands of timouts, and their time has already come! so they will execute immediately one after one. –  exebook May 3 '13 at 9:11
    
Oh I see!! Sorry I misundersood completely. Hmmm this might actually be the best solution of all. I will do some testing and get back to you. If it is better than what I am currenly using I will reaward you the answer. Thanks! –  gordyr May 3 '13 at 11:12
    
Right, having tested your suggestion its perfect except for the fact that order is not guaranteed. I am enclosing them in an anonymous function and passing in the index but over large arrays I am finding variations in order. Presumably where one of the timeouts has executed before another. I'm not sure why this is happening. I would have expected all browsers to queue them all but it appears that is not the case. I'll do some further testing in case I have made a mistake somewhere. –  gordyr May 3 '13 at 13:47

Is there anything better?

If you’re OK with it working only in modern browsers – then you should look into “Web Workers”, that let you execute JS in the background.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/Using_web_workers

share|improve this answer
    
I have a lot of experience with webworkers but unfortunately they are not applicable to this situation due to DOM access limitations therefore cannot be used. –  gordyr May 3 '13 at 11:16

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