Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to search in a .sql file for sql statement which starts with CREATE TABLE followed by fields values then keywords [TB_DATA and TB_INDX] and ends by ;

Like

CREATE TABLE HDTB_CODE (IDPK VARCHAR(256) NOT NULL) IN TB_DATA INDEX IN TB_INDX;

.sql file statement is in multiple lines

CREATE TABLE HDTB_CODE
(
IDPK VARCHAR(256) NOT NULL
)
IN TB_DATA
INDEX IN TB_INDX;

--CREATE TABLE HDTB_BYTE
(
RTID VARCHAR(256) NOT NULL
)
IN TB_DATA
INDEX IN TB_INDX;
DROP TABLE HDTB_BYTE;
CREATE TABLE HDTB_RES
(
ARTID VARCHAR(256) NOT NULL
)
IN TB_DATA
INDEX IN TB_INDX;
CREATE TABLE HDTB_DE
(
IDPK VARCHAR(256) NOT NULL
);

-------------output----------------------

CREATE TABLE HDTB_CODE
(
IDPK VARCHAR(256) NOT NULL
)
IN TB_DATA
INDEX IN TB_INDX;

CREATE TABLE HDTB_RES
(
ARTID VARCHAR(256) NOT NULL
)
IN TB_DATA
INDEX IN TB_INDX;
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Try this:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $filename = 'somefile.sql';
open(my $fh, '<', $filename) || die "unable to open '$filename' for read; $!";

local $/ = "";     # Paragraph mode
while (<$fh>) {
    if (/^CREATE TABLE.+TB_DATA.+TB_INDX/s) {
        print   # or do something else
    }
}

close $fh;

The use of an empty string in $/ marks "paragraph mode", which means the record separator is two (or more) new-lines, so it breaks on the blank lines (if that is not the case, then you could use ";\n").

The s modifier after the regular expression is required for . to match new-lines.

share|improve this answer
    
what if there is no newline. how to use it as Paragraph mode –  Vivek May 10 '13 at 7:19
    
Sorry for the delay, I have been away. If there is no newline then pick something else for the record seperator. $/ can be set to just about anything, paragraph mode is just a convienient short-cut (comes from awk). –  cdarke May 29 '13 at 9:21
use strict;
use warnings;

$/ = '';
print grep { $_ =~ /CREATE TABLE/ && $_ =~ /INDEX/} <>;

Or:

$/ = '';
print grep { /^CREATE TABLE.+TB_DATA.+TB_INDX/s} <>;

Usage:

script_name.pl sql_file

share|improve this answer
    
Not without the s modifier. –  cdarke May 3 '13 at 8:20
    
It is splited into two regex, so it works. One regex will indeed need the s modifier.I added a second option though, with your nice regex :) –  Mattan May 3 '13 at 8:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.