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I was playing with GDB. x/<op> $var is the command to view the current values right? I don't realize what has caused the value of x/d $rbx to change from 28 to -5604 in following sequence of command, since I have not taken any new step using stepi or anything. Any iea?

(gdb) x/s $rbx
0x7fffffffe718:  "\034\352\377\377\377\177"
(gdb) x/d $rbx
0x7fffffffe718: 28
(gdb) x/s $rbx
0x7fffffffe718:  "\034\352\377\377\377\177"
(gdb) x/1ws $rbx
0x7fffffffe718:  U"\xffffea1c翿"
(gdb) x/1wd $rbx
0x7fffffffe718: -5604

(gdb) x/d $rbx
0x7fffffffe718: -5604

(gdb) x/s $rbx
0x7fffffffe718:  "\034\352\377\377\377\177"
(gdb) x/d $rbx
0x7fffffffe718: 28
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Looks to me like gbd was first set up for a byte unit size (0x1c is 28 decimal). Then when you change it to word (4 byte) size it uses the entire value of 0xffffea1c, which is -5604 when printed as a signed decimal number. –  Michael May 3 '13 at 9:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't realize what has caused the value of x/d $rbx to change from 28 to -5604

The value in memory at address 0x7fffffffe718 has not changed.

What changed is the number of bytes GDB examines by default.

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