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This might be a silly question. I know that compiler will remove unused locals. But if I write my code like this:

class MyClass
{
    public int SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
          ...
        }
    }

    public void SomeFunction ()
    {
       //will this line be removed if i is never used?
       int i = SomeProperty;
       ...
    }
}

I am wondering that if i will be removed by compiler because of optimization. There is logic inside the getter of SomeProperty that I wish to execute. If i will be removed, I have to change SomeProperty to a function.

Btw, is there a way to know which line will be optimized by compiler?

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You'll be fine! Compiler it's smart enough to know –  Charleh May 3 '13 at 9:39
15  
I would suggest that what the compiler does is not important. This is bad design. If calling a getter has important side effects then it should probably not be a getter. The most a getter should probably be doing is lazy initialising something and this shouldn't be important since if it doesn't happen it will just get done by the next thing to get it. I don't know what you are doing but it probably should be refactored into its own method that can be called explicitly at that point. If nothing else somebody else looking at the code might refactor it out as a pointless assignment... –  Chris May 3 '13 at 9:41
2  
Related: stackoverflow.com/a/2162893/284240 "C# compiler never ever does this sort of optimization; as noted, doing so would require that the compiler peer into the code being called and verify that the result it computes does not change over the lifetime of the callee's code. The C# compiler does not do so. The JIT compiler might." –  Tim Schmelter May 3 '13 at 9:42
    
If your code (inside SomeProperty) can be split into multiple responsibilities, one of which is to set the property the other which is to do some work that you need to get done, then it would be better to split those two out and call the "DoWhateverItIsYouNeedDone()" explicitly from SomeFunction, no? –  SonarJetLens May 3 '13 at 9:44
    
@Chris: You should post that comment as an answer, as any correct answer is on the lines of "if you need to know then you're doing something wrong". –  Binary Worrier May 3 '13 at 9:47
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would suggest that what the compiler does is not important. This is bad design.

If calling a getter has important side effects then it should probably not be a getter. The most a getter should probably be doing is lazy initialising something and this shouldn't be important since if it doesn't happen it will just get done by the next thing to get it.

I don't know what you are doing but it probably should be refactored into its own method that can be called explicitly at that point.

The other major concern is relate to readability. Anybody seeing the line int i = SomeProperty; when i is never used again might well decide that the line is pointless and does nothing and thus remove it from the code causing whatever unexpected errors to arise. You would be better off calling a method like LogicExtractedFromProperty() so it is obvious you are doing something.

The compiler might (or might not, I don't know or care) do the right thing but a person may well not.

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+1 : for your two cents –  Binary Worrier May 3 '13 at 11:32
    
thanks guys! It is a piece of code I saw in our software. Just curious if it will actually work :) –  Xinchao May 3 '13 at 13:44
    
What if that property getter is a Lazy<T>.Value? I can't change it's design. I know the first idea would be not to use Lazy if I need it's value immediately, but that's only partial case and not always needed. But at some point I must pre-load Value and return initialized Lazy<T> object. Is it dangerous and may be changed in future versions of compiler for example? –  Oleksandr Pshenychnyy Jun 19 at 9:14
    
@OleksandrPshenychnyy: I've not used Lazy<T> at all so I don't know if it does anything that is particularly special but my above argument still stands I think. You should not be calling a property get just to evaluate side effects. If you think Lazy is a special case then I'd advise asking a question about its behaviour specifically (with reference to this question perhaps and why you think the answer doesn't apply). –  Chris Jun 19 at 11:02
    
Thanks for answer. I decided to add guard clause after call to Value property: if (!lazy.IsValueCreated){ //Write warning message }. It will use the values modified by getter and ensure it is not removed by compiler. Unfortunately I can't avoid relying on behavior of that getter (withing reasonable time). –  Oleksandr Pshenychnyy Jun 19 at 12:22
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