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Here is my sample list:

AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III1           <----- I want to remove this
GGG HHH III3 >>updated <----- I want to keep this
JJJ KKK LLL7

As I'm traversing the list using a For Loop, I want to take note of every row that has a ">>updated" in it and go back one row and remove the older row (not updated) and then move forward to the next row after the ">>updated" row. So basically my final output would be:

AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III3
JJJ KKK LLL7

I am using awk to parse the values of the other fields from a shell script, but I'm just not quite sure how to do this backwards and forwards step. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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1  
Show us the awk you have coded so far, will be a good start to help you. –  fedorqui May 3 '13 at 9:57
    
How big is the real list? If it is not too large then a possible solution is to read the whole lot into an array. Random access is then easy. –  cdarke May 3 '13 at 10:01
1  
Well the actual columns are kind of ugly. They don't quite line up, some fields are empty, I also have to substitute some fields from column A into Column E, etc... –  fembot May 3 '13 at 10:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
awk '{a=$0;getline; if ($0~/>>updated/)print $1,$2,$3; else print a,"\n"$0}' file
AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III3
JJJ KKK LLL7
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Hi again @sudo_O So I'm actually reading a file, doing a For i in 'cat myfile' loop to read through it sequentially and using awk to parse each field in every row and writing the output to a tempfile. Based on your recommendation above, should I go through the pass once and write everything to a file, then go through it a second time using the tac cmd? –  fembot May 3 '13 at 10:02
1  
Ugh, the proper way to loop over a file is while read i; do ... done <myfile –  tripleee May 3 '13 at 10:10
    
@tripleee I can do that too :) but that still doesn't solve my problem of when I get to a row where there is a field matching ">>updated", how do I go back one row and replace the contents of the older row with the new row. –  fembot May 3 '13 at 10:13
1  
No, no, no.. awk reads files record by record you don't need too loop over the file using bash! Given a file of the format in your question my answers will do the required transformation. You already have 2 working solutions. Either your problem is solved, or your question is misleading!? –  iiSeymour May 3 '13 at 10:15
1  
Thanks @sudo_O that worked for me! –  fembot May 4 '13 at 11:37

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r '$!N;s/.*\n(.*)\s+>>updated\s*$/\1/;P;D' file

Keep two lines in the pattern space and delete the first when the last matches you requirements.

An awk solution might be:

awk 'sub(/ *>>updated.*/,""){l=$0;next};NR>1{print l};{l=$0};END{print l}' file
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I'm a little rough with sed. I understand how to do a substitution, but I've only done it with a single line so far. How do I keep two lines in the pattern space? –  fembot May 3 '13 at 10:17
1  
@fembot the sed command N reads the next line into the pattern space and separates it from the current line with a newline \n. The command $!N means except for the last always read in the next line. Used in conjuction with P and D which print/delete upto the first newline, these commands allows sed to process a 2 line window as it flows through file. –  potong May 3 '13 at 10:35
    
Thank you, I'm going to go play around with this now. –  fembot May 3 '13 at 10:37
    
@fembot don't waste your time, this is absolutely NOT a job for sed, it's a job for awk, perl, ruby, etc. –  Ed Morton May 3 '13 at 12:04

tac is nice but not default for all distributions. In case you don't have it available, here is an awk single process one-liner:

awk -F' >>' 'p{if($2~/updated/){p=$1;next}print p}{p=$0}END{print p}' file
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I worded my initial query incorrectly. If my current row is ">>updated", I want to remove the row right before it and replace that with the values in the ">>updated" row. –  fembot May 3 '13 at 11:18
    
@fembot my script does what you said, the output is exactly same as the one in your question. –  Kent May 3 '13 at 11:31
    
+1 for the right approach if memory is a significant concern. –  Ed Morton May 3 '13 at 12:22
perl -lne 'if(/\>\>updated/){pop @a;s/\>\>updated//g;push @a,$_}else{push @a,$_}END{print join "\n",@a}' your_file

tested:

> cat temp
AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III1
GGG HHH III3 >>updated
JJJ KKK LLL7
> perl -lne 'if(/\>\>updated/){pop @a;s/\>\>updated//g;push @a,$_}else{push @a,$_}END{print join "\n",@a}' temp
AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III3 
JJJ KKK LLL7
>
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Thank you! This worked too! –  fembot May 4 '13 at 11:38

The simplest way is to build up an array of the lines in your input file but only increase the array index when >>updated is absent so that lines that do contain >>updated overwrite the previous entry in the array and then just print the contents of the array when you get to the end of file:

$ cat file
AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III1           <----- I want to remove this
GGG HHH III3 >>updated <----- I want to keep this
JJJ KKK LLL7

$ awk '!/>>updated/{++numLines} {line[numLines]=$0} END {for (nr=1;nr<=numLines;nr++) print line[nr]}' file
AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III3 >>updated <----- I want to keep this
JJJ KKK LLL7

If you want to get rid of the >>updated and subsequent text on that line, you can change the test for it's existence to a test for an attempt to remove it:

$ awk '!sub(/ *>>updated.*/,""){++numLines} {line[numLines]=$0} END{for (nr=1;nr<=numLines;nr++) print line[nr]}' file
AAA BBB CCC1
DDD EEE FFF1
GGG HHH III3
JJJ KKK LLL7

If >>updated was present then the sub() will remove it and return success so you know that >>updated was present, otherwise the sub() will do nothing but return fail so you know that >>updated was absent.

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