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Edit: This question should be considered abandoned. I have flagged this question for deletion as i do not know how to even proceed any more at this point. I thank all of you for your willingness and taking the time out of your day to help me.

I am reading and following the documentation at cplusplus on data structures. I have been trying to figure out why the compiler will not accept " *pfruit.weight; " on my own for hours. It am sure it is something simple that i am missing.

error C2228: left of '.weight' must have class/struct/union
1>          type is 'product *'
1>          did you intend to use '->' instead?

"The operand to the left of the period (.) is not a class, structure, or union."

So how do i correctly access the value pointed by a pointer member?(Not access a reference)

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct product
{
int weight;
float price;
} ;

int main ()
{
product afruit;
product * pfruit;
pfruit = &afruit;

pfruit->weight;
    //Access a member of an object to which we have a reference
//equivalent to: (*pfruit).weight

*pfruit.weight; //<------ I am so sorry, i meant This is the problem, i am using a reworded line of code from an example and it isn't compiling and returning the error.
    //Access the value pointed by a pointer member called weight;
//equivalent to: *(pfruit.weight)

system("pause");
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Try (*pfruit).weight. Error is 100% correct - pfruit is not a structure, it's a pointer to a structure. Please let me know it this answers your question and I'll convert my comment to a proper answer. –  Piotr Justyna May 3 '13 at 10:11
1  
Your comment even says it 'equivalent to: (*pfruit).weight' not 'equivalent to: *pfruit.weight' –  john May 3 '13 at 10:13
    
Since pfruit is a pointer, you can't use the non-pointer member access operator on it. –  Joachim Pileborg May 3 '13 at 10:14
    
I don't understand. "Both expressions pmovie->title and (*pmovie).title are valid and both mean that we are evaluating the member title of the data structure pointed by a pointer called pmovie. It must be clearly differentiated from: *pmovie.title which is equivalent to: *(pmovie.title)" –  user2322359 May 3 '13 at 10:15
    
@user2322359 Simply put, you can use "->" on a pointer and "." on a structure referenced by that pointer. Different notation, same result. –  Piotr Justyna May 3 '13 at 10:18

4 Answers 4

This code

struct product
{
int weight;
float price;
} ;

int main ()
{
    product * pfruit;

    *pfruit.weight;

is an operator precedence error. The rules of C++ are that . has higher precedence than *. *pfruit.weight would be correct if pfruit was a struct and weight was a pointer, but in your code it's the other way around, pfruit is the pointer and weight is just an int. So you need to add brackets to apply the operators the right way around

    (*pfruit).weight;
share|improve this answer
    
Where "pfruit->weight;" will access the member of an object to which we have a reference. AND where (*pfruit).weight; will access the value pointed by a pointer member. The thing that i am not getting though is that "(*pfruit).weight;" is said to be equivalent to "pfruit->weight;" which isn't accessing the value pointed. Or is the documentation wrong? –  user2322359 May 3 '13 at 10:45
    
@user2322359 No you have that wrong. pfruit->weight; and (*pfruit).weight; are the same. They both access the value of weight using a pointer to the fruit structure. *pfruit.weight; is not legal with the declarations you have but it could be legal if you changed your declarations. There are no references, and no pointer members in your code. And it's not clear to me why you think this 'pfruit->weight; which isn't accessing the value pointed.' when that is what it does.I think you must be thinking about this too hard, it's simpler than you think. –  john May 3 '13 at 10:53
    
@user2322359 Member, value, pointer member? You are totally overthinking this. Just think of it like this: 1 + 2 * 3 is not the same as (1 + 2) * 3. The same goes for *pfruit.weight/*(pfruit.weight) and (*pfruit).weight –  Piotr Justyna May 3 '13 at 10:58
    
If you have a pointer to a struct use ->. That's really all you need to know. –  john May 3 '13 at 10:58
    
You say i don't have a reference but from the documentation. "The address that locates a variable within memory is what we call a reference to that variable. This reference to a variable can be obtained by preceding the identifier of a variable with an ampersand sign (&), known as reference operator" i.e. ted = &andy; So "pfruit = &afruit;" is a reference is it not? –  user2322359 May 3 '13 at 11:12

You may use the following statement :

(*pfruit).weight;

Instead of :

*pfruit.weight;

which evaluates at compile-time to the following because of operator precedence :

*(pfruit.weight)

This is wrong because you are dereferencing a non-pointer value and trying to dereference a pointer with the . operator instead of ->.

EDIT :

Here's some piece of response and informations about pointers and to your question as I understood it.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct product
{
  int   *weight;
  float price;
};

int             main()
{
  product       afruit;
  product       *pfruit;

  pfruit = &afruit;

  // Allocating 10 * sizeof(int) bytes of memory. ptr will now point to the first sizeof(int) bytes                                                                                                                                          
  // of the memory pointed by the weight pointer.                                                                                                                                                                                            
  pfruit->weight = new int[10];

  // The first sizeof(int) bytes of the memory pointed by ptr (equivalent to *ptr) equals now the value 4.                                                                                                                                   
  pfruit->weight[0] = 4;

  // The second sizeof(int) bytes of memory pointed by ptr (or (*ptr + 1)) equals now 42.                                                                                                                                                    
  pfruit->weight[1] = 42;

  // Dereferencing pfruit AND the pointer to the weight, thus returning the VALUE of the first sizeof(int) bytes of weight (4)                                                                                                               
  // instead of the value of the pointer to weight (0x8b4e008 for instance).                                                                                                                                                                
  int value = *(pfruit->weight);

  std::cout << "Value of pfruit->weight[0] = " << pfruit->weight[0] << std::endl
            << "Value of pfruit->weight[1] = " << pfruit->weight[1] << std::endl
            << "Value of *(pfruit->weight) = " << *(pfruit->weight) << std::endl
            << "Value of *(pfruit->weight + 1) = " << *(pfruit->weight + 1) << std::endl
            << "Value of ptr = " << std::hex << pfruit->weight << std::endl;

  // Prints :                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  // Value of pfruit->weight[0] = 4                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  // Value of pfruit->weight[1] = 42                                                                                                                                                                                                         
  // Value of *(pfruit->weight) = 4                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  // Value of *(pfruit->weight + 1) = 42                                                                                                                                                                                                     
  // Value of ptr = 0x8b4e008                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  //                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
  // Note that ptr[0] == *ptr and ptr[1] == (*ptr + 1)                                                                                                                                                                                       
  return (0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I apologize and thank you for your willingness to help me but i meant that ( *pfruit.weight; ) is what i am having issue with. How do i access the value pointed by a pointer member called weight? (Ignore pfruit->weight;) If you could correct my code to where it accesses a value (like 10) pointed by a pointer member called weight that would certainly put me on the right tack to mentally grasping this. –  user2322359 May 3 '13 at 11:49
    
I didn't fully understand but from what I did, it seems you are saying that weight is a member (a pointer actually) of product. I edited my answer as a response to your question –  Halim Qarroum May 3 '13 at 12:19
1  
@HalimQarroum I hope you manage to get a better idea about what the OP is talking about than I did. But I really don't think he means 'pointer member' in the way you have shown. You've edited his structure declaration. –  john May 3 '13 at 12:25
    
@user2322359 Is the edit responding to your question ? –  Halim Qarroum May 3 '13 at 12:46
1  
No, not quite. But the edit is useful material pertaining to the subject i am on and i have learned from your post. I am sorry i have failed so miserably at communicating and understanding the issues with you and everyone else. Thank you very much for your help and time and this question should be considered abandoned as i have given up on this particular question of mine for the time being. –  user2322359 May 3 '13 at 13:38

enter image description here

once try this u may get it this can be written as pfruit->weight or (*pfruit).weight

   (*pfruit).weight;
share|improve this answer
    
I apologize and thank you for your willingness to help me but i meant that ( *pfruit.weight; ) is what i am having issue with. How do i access the value pointed by a pointer member called weight? (Ignore pfruit->weight;) If you could correct my code to where it accesses a value (like 10) pointed by a pointer member called weight that would certainly put me on the right tack to mentally grasping this. –  user2322359 May 3 '13 at 11:49
product afruit;
product * pfruit;
pfruit = &afruit;

pfruit->weight; 

pfruit is a pointer and has the address of the struct afruit. We use pfruit->weight when we access struct members using a pointer .

When you use a struct name you use . operator. Now, pfruit is the pointer . Therefore, the struct itself is *pfruit

*pfruit.weight;

This is interpreted as *(pfruit.weight), because .has higher precedence than *. and you can't use . operator with a pointer on LHS

You have to clearly show that you mean (*pfruit).weight

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