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I have a scenario like this:

a = ["file1","file2","file3","file1","file2","file1","file5"]
set_flag = 0
for i in range (len(a)):
    file_name = '%s.txt' %(a[i])
    file_write = open('%s'%(file_name),'w')

The above works and writes files. However,I want to include a logic such that even though some file names appear more than once in the above list the file_write should happen only once. There should not be multiple file writes. E.g. if file1 appears 4 times it should only be written once. With that the set_flag should be set to say "1" so that if I try writing the file1 anywhere in my code it should should bypass the file write.Any ideas how to accomplish this and set such a flag..?

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Thanks for all the thoughts. However, I still have a query- how will I know that the file_write for say file1 has already taken place in past. One way is to use OS functions to check in the directory. Any other/simpler way tpo accomplish this? –  user741592 May 3 '13 at 12:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

use set(), it only stores a single copy of an item:

>>> a=["file1","file2","file3","file1","file2","file1","file5"]
>>> set(a)
set(['file3', 'file2', 'file1', 'file5'])

for your code, this will maintain the order as well.:

a=["file1","file2","file3","file1","file2","file1","file5"]
seen=set()
for file in a:               #you can iterate over a list itself
    if file not in seen:     #if file is not in the set then write 
       file_name= '%s.txt' %(file)
       file_write= open('%s'%(file_name),'w')
       seen.add(file)  #add file to seen
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all the thoughts. However, I still have a query- how will I know that the file_write for say file1 has already taken place in past. One way is to use OS functions to check in the directory. Any other/simpler way to accomplish this? –  user741592 May 3 '13 at 12:23
    
@user741592 For any file on which the file_write has been performed will be added to the set seen, so you simply check whether it is present in that set or not : "file1" in seen –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 3 '13 at 12:25

A set is a good idea, so you just iterate through the unique file names in your list. Also, don't use range(len(...)) and some other cleanups:

a = ["file1","file2","file3","file1","file2","file1","file5"]
set_flag = 0
for file_name in set(a):
    file_write = open(file_name + '.txt', 'w')
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And if for some reason the order of creating output files is required, then an OrderedDict can be used (in 2.7+):

for fname in OrderedDict.fromkeys(a):
    with open(fname, 'w') as fout:
        pass
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