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The MS documentation (and others) "clearly" states:

... Because the normal OnOk and OnCancel member functions of a CDialog object would call EndDialog, make sure your modeless dialog box does not call those functions and instead overrides

Since CDialog::OnOk effectively calls CDialog::EndDialog, and that method looks like:

void CDialog::EndDialog(int nResult)
{
    ASSERT(::IsWindow(m_hWnd));

    if (m_nFlags & (WF_MODALLOOP|WF_CONTINUEMODAL))
        EndModalLoop(nResult);

    ::EndDialog(m_hWnd, nResult);
}

we can also check the docs for ::EndDialog which again "clearly" state:

Dialog boxes created by the DialogBox, DialogBoxParam, DialogBoxIndirect, and DialogBoxIndirectParam functions must be destroyed using the EndDialog function. An application calls EndDialog from within the dialog box procedure; the function must not be used for any other purpose.

Yet, I have a CDialog derived class that has it's default behavior wrt. OnOKand seemingly everything is working when I use it non-modal / modeless.

That is: * When I close the (modeless) dialog, it is closed/removed from view. * The application doesn't show any memory leaks. (MFC debug build)

So what? Do I need to prevent EndDialog and call DestroyWindow myself or not?


Note: I know what the docs and "the web" says. It's just that I haven't yet found why I need to do it differently, and this one class should be usable for modeless and modal mode, so not having to do anything different might be handy.

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1  
I suspect you are leaking a window. This wouldn't appear as a memory leak in your application because windows are maintained by the system. Check the "USER objects" column in Task Manager to see if the value grows over time. –  arx May 3 '13 at 19:59
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The MSDN Docs for CDialog::OnOK clearly states

If you implement the OK button in a modeless dialog box, you must override the OnOK method and call DestroyWindow inside it. Do not call the base-class method, because it calls EndDialog which makes the dialog box invisible but does not destroy it

So you would need to override CDialog::OnOK and call DestroyWindow() inside -- here's a modified example from MSDN:

class CDlg : public CDialog
{
    ...
    BOOL m_bModal;
    ...
}

CDlg::CDlg(CWnd* pParent /*=NULL*/)
: CDialog(CDlg::IDD, pParent)
{
    ...
    m_bModal = FALSE;
    ...
}

INT_PTR CDlg::DoModal()
{   m_bModal = TRUE;
    const INT_PTR rval = CDialog::DoModal();
    m_bModal = FALSE;
    return rval;
}

void CDlg::OnOK() 
{ 
   if (!UpdateData(TRUE)) 
   {
      TRACE(_T("UpdateData failed during dialog termination\n"));
      // The UpdateData routine will set focus to correct item
      return;
   }
   if (m_bModal)
       EndDialog(IDOK);
   else
       DestroyWindow();
}

void CDlg::OnCancel()
{
   if (m_bModal)
       EndDialog(IDCANCEL);
   else
       DestroyWindow();
}
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Thanks. I think I didn't check the method docs here. This seems pretty clear now. –  Martin Ba May 4 '13 at 8:25
    
@MartinBa updated code above to handle modal and modeless dialogs –  Edward Clements May 4 '13 at 8:30
    
Are you positive this works? In my original case I stepped through the CDialog::EndDialog function and I think I remember these flags also being set on my modeless dialog created with Create ... haven't got the code here though to check this atm. –  Martin Ba May 4 '13 at 8:33
    
Sorry, no -- will fire up an example project and get back to you –  Edward Clements May 4 '13 at 8:37
    
couldn't try this out (have some problems with my VisualStudio), but I looked into the MFC sources, it looks like the flags are being set in both cases, there don't seem to be any other flags either -- the easiest fix seems to be to have a member variable m_bModal and set it on DoModal; if you have a lot of dialog boxes like this, it would be better to make up your own intermediate base class derived from CDialog and use this class as the base class for all your dialogs –  Edward Clements May 4 '13 at 9:03
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