Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following matrices:

A=zeros(2,4);
D=[ 1 2;
    3 4;
    5 6;
    7 8];

v=rand(1,8);

For example:

v= [0.8147    0.9058    0.1270    0.9134    0.6324    0.0975    0.2785    0.5469]

Now when I run A(D)=v, A becomes:

A=[0.8147    0.9058    0.1270    0.9134;
   0.6324    0.0975    0.2785    0.5469]

When I change D entries to another values, I get different configurations of A, for example, if I put:

D=[ 8 7;
    6 5;
    4 3;
    2 1];

then A becomes:

A=[0.5469    0.2785    0.0975    0.6324;
   0.9134    0.1270    0.9058    0.8147]

Does any one know what this kind of indexing is?

share|improve this question
5  
It's linear indexing: mathworks.com/help/matlab/math/matrix-indexing.html#f1-85511 –  Dan May 3 '13 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So to make it clearer lets redefine your v as

v = 10:10:80

(i.e. v = [10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80];)

Now when

 D=[8 7;
    6 5; 
    4 3; 
    2 1];

then

A(D)=v

    A =

    80    70    60    50
    40    30    20    10

Lets look at how this works. So firstly when you index A by D, D gets flattened so A(D) = v is the same as A(D(:)) = v (test it!) and

D(:)

ans =

     8
     6
     4
     2
     7
     5
     3
     1

So for breaking it down element by element we're going A(D(1)) = v(1) which after substituting for D(1) and v(1) is A(8) = 10, hence the last element is 10. Lets look a few elements further. A(D(4)) = v(4) become A(2) = 40. but which element is A(2)? Well linear indexing counts down the rows first (column major ordering) i.e.

A(1) == A(1,1)
A(2) == A(2,1)
A(3) == A(1,2)
A(4) == A(2,2)
A(5) == A(1,3)
A(6) == A(2,3)
etc...

So A(2) is in the (2,1) position etc...

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you so much –  Faroq Al-tam May 4 '13 at 0:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.