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Being stuck in TR1 land, for a test program I need to perform certain operations on a number of objects of specific types. I have a couple of tuple type definitions which look like this:

typedef std::tr1::tuple< bool
                       , signed char
                       , signed short
                       , signed int
                       , signed long long
                       , unsigned char
                       , unsigned short
                       , unsigned int
                       , unsigned long long >  integral_types;

From each tuple type an object is to be created. I then have function templates similar to this:

template<typename T>
void invoke_operation_1(T& obj);

These need to be called for all objects in a tuple object.

How do I do that in C++03?

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1  
    
Isn't there tuple_size and get in tr1? –  jrok May 3 '13 at 14:03
    
The Boost.Fusion approach should be C++03-compatible. A manual approach is here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '13 at 14:03
3  
@sbi: Who said anything about homework? SO questions are expected to demonstrate prior research. :) Your urgency is not relevant... –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '13 at 14:03
2  
Oops, I noticed that your question specifically asks about C++03: nevermind the close vote. The two questions could (should?) probably be merged in a single one, though. –  Luc Touraille May 3 '13 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use boost::fusion if you need to call the same templated function for every object in the tuple. E.g.

template<typename T>
void invoke_operation_1(T& obj)
{
    std::cout << obj << std::endl;
}

struct executor
{
    template<typename T>
    void operator()(T& t) const
    {
        invoke_operation_1(t);
    }
};

typedef boost::tuple< bool
                       , signed char
                       , signed short
                       , signed int
                       , signed long long
                       , unsigned char
                       , unsigned short
                       , unsigned int
                       , unsigned long long >  integral_types;
int main()
{
    integral_types t(true, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7);
    boost::fusion::for_each(t, executor());
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was hesitant to bring in boost::fusion just to do that, but this looks really convenient, so I might give it a try anyway. What conditions must executor meet? Would some std::tr1::bind() expression work instead? With argument placeholders? –  sbi May 3 '13 at 14:26
    
@sbi The docuentation says a Regular Callable Object so a bind expression should ok. –  mkaes May 3 '13 at 14:32
    
@sbi since invoke_operation_1 is a template and not a function, I doubt boost::bind will work. At least I could not find any overloads taking template template arguments, which would be needed here. –  Arne Mertz May 3 '13 at 14:38
    
@ArneMertz: You got a point there, I just ran into this. :) Well, then I'll just have to wrap it into a function object, I think. Thanks, @mkaes! –  sbi May 3 '13 at 14:41
    
Well, since in the end I did indeed use fusion, I accepted this answer. Thanks to everyone who put effort into this! –  sbi May 3 '13 at 15:20

There was a feature just finalized in Bristol for C++14 to address this very problem. It's not too hard to deal with.

For the simpler case, you can use a recursive template. It's a smidge of a mess though without partial function specialization and such.

template<typename Tup, std::size_t N> struct visit_detail {
     template<typename F> static void call(Tup& t, F f) {
         f(std::tr1::get<N>(t));
         return visit_detail<Tup, N+1>::call(t, f);
     }
};
template<typename Tup> struct visit_detail<Tup, std::tr1::tuple_size<Tup>::value> {
    template<typename F> static void call(Tup& t, F f) {}
}

template<typename Tup, typename F> void visit(Tup& t, F f) {
    return visit_detail<Tup, 0>::call(t, f);
}

Here f can be hardcoded or a parameter function object or whatever you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so there is indeed a tuple_size. Thanks, I think I can work it out from there! –  sbi May 3 '13 at 14:07
    
@DeadMG: Yikes! Can you remember the name of the C++14 feature, for reference? –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '13 at 14:08
    
N3493 slightly revised –  Puppy May 3 '13 at 14:10
    
@DeadMG: Thanks; looks interesting (hope they don't retain the text 'compile-time' in the final wording, though!) –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 3 '13 at 14:14

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