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I have a very simple class, but already run into pain with the definition of ‘this’ in Typescript:

Typescript

/// <reference path='jquery.d.ts' />
/// <reference path='bootstrap.d.ts' />

module Problem {
    export class Index {
        detailsUrl: string;
        constructor() {
            $('.problem-detail-button').click((e) => {

                e.preventDefault();

                var $row = $(this).closest('tr'); //this must be that of the callback
                var problemId: number = $row.data('problem-id');

                $.ajax({
                    url: this.detailsUrl, //this must be the instance of the class
                    data: { id: problemId },
                    type: 'POST',
                    success: (result) => {
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder').html(result);
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder modal').modal('show');
                    },
                })
            });
        }
    }
}

Javascript

var Problem;
(function (Problem) {
    var Index = (function () {
        function Index() {
            var _this = this;
            $('.problem-detail-button').click(function (e) {
                e.preventDefault();
                var $row = $(_this).closest('tr');
                var problemId = $row.data('problem-id');
                $.ajax({
                    url: _this.detailsUrl,
                    data: {
                        id: problemId
                    },
                    type: 'POST',
                    success: function (result) {
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder').html(result);
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder modal').modal('show');
                    }
                });
            });
        }
        return Index;
    })();
    Problem.Index = Index;    
})(Problem || (Problem = {}));

Now the problem is that the line

var $row = $(this).closest('tr'); //this must be that of the callback

and this line

this.detailsUrl, //this must be the instance of the class

conflict in the meaning of 'this'

How do you handle the mixture of the 'this'?

share|improve this question
    
Oooooo, interested to see what the brains say about this one! That seems like a different case from all the other TS + "this" questions here on SO... –  Alex Dresko May 3 '13 at 14:29
2  
Actually have this case mentioned in my presentation as well: basarat.github.io/TypeScriptDeepDive/#/this –  basarat May 3 '13 at 14:45
1  
@BasaratAli I think there's probably a lot of great information in that presentation, but it's very difficult to understand in that format. Slides, I feel, should be accompanied with a video or at least a more descriptive writeup. –  Alex Dresko May 3 '13 at 20:45
    
Would recommend readers of this question to study above link (basarat.github.io/TypeScriptDeepDive/#/this) as it explains Typescript's handling of 'this' in conjunction with arrow function. So you get to understand why the accepted answer is the solution. –  Aidan Sep 8 '13 at 9:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted
module Problem {
export class Index {
    detailsUrl: string;
    constructor() {
        var that = this;
        $('.problem-detail-button').click(function (e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            var $row = $(this).closest('tr'); //this must be that of the callback
            var problemId: number = $row.data('problem-id');

            $.ajax({
                url: that.detailsUrl, //this must be the instance of the class
                data: { id: problemId },
                type: 'POST',
                success: (result) => {
                    $('#details-modal-placeholder').html(result);
                    $('#details-modal-placeholder modal').modal('show');
                },
            })
        });
    }
}
}

Explicitly declare that = this so you have a reference for that.detailsUrl, then don't use a fat arrow for the click handler, so you get the correct this scope for the callback.

Playground.

share|improve this answer
    
that is perfect... should've seen it. Late on friday :) –  Oliver May 3 '13 at 14:55
    
+1 for being so awesome :) –  basarat May 3 '13 at 15:47

You need to fallback to the standard way of javascript. i.e store the variable as :

var self = this; 

Then you can use function instead of ()=> and use this to access variable in callback and self to access the instance of the class.

Here is the complete code sample:

module Problem {
    export class Index {
        detailsUrl: string;
        constructor() {
            var self = this; 
            $('.problem-detail-button').click(function(e){

                e.preventDefault();

                var $row = $(this).closest('tr'); //this must be that of the callback
                var problemId: number = $row.data('problem-id');

                $.ajax({
                    url: self.detailsUrl, //this must be the instance of the class
                    data: { id: problemId },
                    type: 'POST',
                    success: (result) => {
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder').html(result);
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder modal').modal('show');
                    },
                })
            });
        }
    }
}

// Creating 
var foo:any = {};
foo.x = 3;
foo.y='123';

var jsonString = JSON.stringify(foo);
alert(jsonString);


// Reading
interface Bar{
    x:number;
    y?:string; 
}

var baz:Bar = JSON.parse(jsonString);
alert(baz.y);

And your generated javascript:

var Problem;
(function (Problem) {
    var Index = (function () {
        function Index() {
            var self = this;
            $('.problem-detail-button').click(function (e) {
                e.preventDefault();
                var $row = $(this).closest('tr');
                var problemId = $row.data('problem-id');
                $.ajax({
                    url: self.detailsUrl,
                    data: {
                        id: problemId
                    },
                    type: 'POST',
                    success: function (result) {
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder').html(result);
                        $('#details-modal-placeholder modal').modal('show');
                    }
                });
            });
        }
        return Index;
    })();
    Problem.Index = Index;    
})(Problem || (Problem = {}));
var foo = {
};
foo.x = 3;
foo.y = '123';
var jsonString = JSON.stringify(foo);
alert(jsonString);
var baz = JSON.parse(jsonString);
alert(baz.y);
share|improve this answer
    
This is sort of confusingly worded. Edit: Much clearer now. –  Ryan Cavanaugh May 3 '13 at 14:38
    
@RyanCavanaugh +1 then? –  basarat May 3 '13 at 14:42
2  
Sure :) Why do comments have to be 15 characters? –  Ryan Cavanaugh May 3 '13 at 14:46
    
Very nice. +1'd. Shot for the response. –  Oliver May 3 '13 at 14:56
1  
@RyanCavanaugh the character limit is amusing - especially as it includes the name tag - so I could just comment with your name tag, but I can't just say "Sure". –  Steve Fenton May 3 '13 at 15:53

If you're only supporting browsers that have .addEventListener, I'd suggest using that to associate your data with your elements.

Instead of implementing your code, I'll just give a simple example.

function MyClass(el) {
    this.el = el;
    this.foo = "bar";
    el.addEventListener("click", this, false);
}

MyClass.prototype.handleEvent = function(event) {
    this[event.type] && this[event.type](event);
};

MyClass.prototype.click = function(event) {
    // Here you have access to the data object
    console.log(this.foo); // "bar"

    // ...and therefore the element that you stored
    console.log(this.el.nodeName); // "DIV"

    // ...or you could use `event.currentElement` to get the bound element
};

So this technique gives you an organized coupling between elements and data.

Even if you need to support old IE, you can shim it using .attachEvent().

So then to use it, you just pass the element to the constructor when setting up the data.

new MyClass(document.body);

If all the logic is in your handler(s), you don't even need to keep a reference to the object you created, since the handlers automatically get it via this.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is great, I didn't know about handleEvent and the event listener interface. But it seems you should always use event (or e) inside handleEvent, or e will be undefined. –  bfavaretto May 3 '13 at 14:54
    
@bfavaretto: Thanks for catching that. I'll update. –  squint May 3 '13 at 14:57

I normally bind this to a variable as soon as I have it in the scope I want.

However the this you are after could be found like this:

constructor() {
    var class_this=this;
    $('.problem-detail-button').click(function (e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        var callback_this=e.target;
share|improve this answer
    
I agree target will fix this exact issue but it brought into mind a larger question about mixing the scope of 'this' –  Oliver May 3 '13 at 14:56

Late to the thread, but I have something different to suggestion.

Instead of:

var $row = $(this).closest('tr'); //this must be that of the callback

Consider using:

var $row = $(e.currentTarget).closest('tr');

As in this example, anywhere you might want to use this in a jQuery callback, you have access to a function parameter you can use instead. I would suggest that using these parameters instead of this is cleaner (where "cleaner" is defined as more expressive and less likely to be turned into a bug during future maintenance).

share|improve this answer

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