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If I have some code like this -

public class BaseClass
{
  [TestFixtureTeardown]
  public void SomeMethod()
  {
   ...
  }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
  [TestFixtureTeardown]
  public void SomeMethod2()
  {
   ...
  }
}

Now, TestFixtureTeardown attribute works (and correctly so) like this - it will execute the method SomeMethod2() and then SomeMethod(), i.e., it will execute the method of derived class first and then of base class in case we decorate them with TestFixtureTeardown attribute. Now here's my problem - I am provider of the BaseClass and other developers will write the Derived classes. But it's not guaranteed that they will write a method decorated with TestFixtureTeardown attribute. So what can I do to enforce them to write a method decorated with such an attribute? So in general what I am asking is - how to force a class implementation to have a method with a specific attribute on it?

Any suggestions?

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1  
Do you need to explicitly have this attribute on derived classes? Attributes can be defined as being inherited and this particular TestFixtureTeardown attribute is defined that way. Again, I haven't tested this myself, but what if you made the method virtual to allow them to override it, abstract to force them to implement it (will not work of course if you want some base implementation)? –  Steven Magana-Zook May 3 '13 at 14:58
    
I am thinking on the same lines. –  Kumar Vaibhav May 3 '13 at 15:26
    
@StevenMagana-Zook - Hey Steven, even if I make the method abstract with TestFixtureTeardown attrib on it I don't think the attribute would apply to derived class method implementation. :( –  Kumar Vaibhav May 4 '13 at 15:59
    
But in any case, what about this question - "So in general what I am asking is - how to force a class implementation to have a method with a specific attribute on it?" –  Kumar Vaibhav May 4 '13 at 15:59

1 Answer 1

What version of NUnit are you using? I am guessing it is > 2.5, since your first example would not work unless that was true.

Beginning with NUnit 2.5, a base class with this attribute (TestFixtureTeardown) will be called after each test method in the derived class.

In short, you do not need to require that derived classes define this attribute - your base class method will be called regardless.

See more info about this on the NUnit doc page about the TestFixtureTeardown attribute.

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TestFixtureTeardown does not get called after each test. It gets called one per test class when all test methods are over. –  Kumar Vaibhav May 3 '13 at 15:07
    
I am using 2.6.x –  Kumar Vaibhav May 3 '13 at 15:07
1  
Directly from the NUnit doc page for TestFixtureTeardown attribute: "The TestFixtureTearDown attribute is inherited from any base class. Therefore, if a base class has defined a TestFixtureTearDown method, that method will be called after each test method in the derived class." Maybe it is a bug in NUnit docs. –  Scott Miller May 3 '13 at 15:11
    
My bad Scott. But the same doc also specifies - "NUnit will call base class TestFixtureTearDown methods after those in the derived classes." So if a developer does not write a TestFixtureTearDown method in derived class then my base class TestFixtureTearDown method gets called BEFORE any tests are executed. My base class is providing some object to each test class and I want to dispose that object using base class. So I want to FORCE the following pattern - derived class TestFixtureTeardown method to be executed and then base class TestFixtureTeardown method to be executed. –  Kumar Vaibhav May 3 '13 at 15:40
    
Hmmm. I haven't used NUnit in a while so I could easily be wrong, but I don't read the description of the TestFixtureTearDown attribute on base classes that way. Yes, it will be called after derived methods, but in absence of any derived classes I would expect the base class method to be called at the end of the test method also. –  Scott Miller May 3 '13 at 16:04

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