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I am looking into SSE instructions which are great and started to work some simple code to measure the difference between a function using them and the same function using "standard" code (i.e non SSE). I realised that when I compiled the code (with the -O3 flag), the version using the SSE version of the function is actually (very slightly) "slower" than the version of the program which is NOT using SSE instructions. My guess is that:

  1. the compiler does an excellent job at optimising the code
  2. the SSE function could run faster but there's a cost to loading the floats to the registers which cancels out the benefit from using the SSE instructions.
  3. the testSSE() function is not complex enough to really show a difference between a version of the program using SSE and one that doesn't.

Could anyone tell me what his/her thoughts are on this? Thanks a lot -

EDIT: so I corrected the code (see below the 2 code listings). Even with the corrected version which is shorter, the SSE version gives me 2''48 while the non-SSE version gives me 1''36, confirming the fact that, in that case the compiler does a better job than me!

EDIT: OLD CODE WITH BUG (see below correction version)

// compiled with c++ tmp.cpp -msse4 -o testSSE -O3

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pmmintrin.h>

inline void testSSE(float *node1, float *node2, float *node3, float *node4, float *result)
{
    __m128 tmp0, tmp1, tmp2, tmp3;
    __m128 l, r;

    l = _mm_load_ps(node1);         //_mm_store_ps(result, l); fprintf(stderr, "1 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    r = _mm_load_ps(node1 + 4);     //_mm_store_ps(result, r); fprintf(stderr, "2 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    tmp0 = _mm_hadd_ps(l, r);       //_mm_store_ps(result, tmp0); fprintf(stderr, "3 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);

    l = _mm_load_ps(node2);         //_mm_store_ps(result, l); fprintf(stderr, "4 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    r = _mm_load_ps(node2 + 4);     //_mm_store_ps(result, r); fprintf(stderr, "5 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    tmp1 = _mm_hadd_ps(l, r);       //_mm_store_ps(result, tmp0); fprintf(stderr, "6 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);

    l = _mm_load_ps(node3);
    r = _mm_load_ps(node3 + 4);
    tmp2 = _mm_hadd_ps(l, r);

    l = _mm_load_ps(node4);         //_mm_store_ps(result, l); fprintf(stderr, "10 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    r = _mm_load_ps(node4 + 4);     //_mm_store_ps(result, r); fprintf(stderr, "11 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    tmp3 = _mm_hadd_ps(l, r);       //_mm_store_ps(result, tmp0); fprintf(stderr, "12 %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);

    l = _mm_hadd_ps(tmp0, tmp1);
    r = _mm_hadd_ps(tmp2, tmp3);

    __m128 pDest = _mm_hadd_ps(l, r);

    _mm_store_ps(result, pDest);    // fprintf(stderr, "FINAL %f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
}

void test(float *node1, float *node2, float *node3, float *node4, float *result)
{
    float tmp0[4], tmp1[4], tmp2[4], tmp3[4];
    tmp0[0] = node1[0] + node1[1];
    tmp0[1] = node1[2] + node1[3];
    tmp0[2] = node1[4] + node1[5];
    tmp0[3] = node1[6] + node1[7];

    tmp1[0] = node2[0] + node2[1];
    tmp1[1] = node2[2] + node2[3];
    tmp1[2] = node2[4] + node2[5];
    tmp1[3] = node2[6] + node2[7];

    tmp2[0] = node3[0] + node3[1];
    tmp2[1] = node3[2] + node3[3];
    tmp2[2] = node3[4] + node3[5];
    tmp2[3] = node3[6] + node3[7];

    tmp3[0] = node4[0] + node4[1];
    tmp3[1] = node4[2] + node4[3];
    tmp3[2] = node4[4] + node4[5];
    tmp3[3] = node4[6] + node4[7];

    float l[4], r[4];
    l[0] = tmp0[0] + tmp0[1];
    l[1] = tmp0[2] + tmp0[3];
    l[2] = tmp1[0] + tmp1[1];
    l[3] = tmp1[2] + tmp1[3];

    r[0] = tmp2[0] + tmp2[1];
    r[1] = tmp2[2] + tmp2[3];
    r[2] = tmp3[0] + tmp3[1];
    r[3] = tmp3[2] + tmp3[3];

    result[0] = l[0] + l[1];
    result[1] = l[2] + l[3];
    result[2] = r[0] + r[1];
    result[3] = r[2] + r[3];

}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int nnodes = 4;
    double t = clock();
    for (int k = 0; k < 10000000; ++k) {
        float *data = new float [nnodes * 8];
        for (int i = 0; i < nnodes * 8; ++i) { data[i] = (i / 8) + 1; /* fprintf(stderr, "data %02d %f\n", i, data[i]); */ }
        float result[4];
        int off = sizeof(float) * 8;
        testSSE(data, data + 8, data + 16, data + 24, result);
        delete [] data;
    }
    fprintf(stderr, "%02f (sec)\n", (clock() - t) / (float)CLOCKS_PER_SEC);
    return 0;
}

EDIT: new (corrected) code

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pmmintrin.h>

inline void testSSE(float *node1, float *node2, float *node3, float *node4, float *result)
{
    __m128 tmp0, tmp1, tmp2, tmp3;

    tmp0 = _mm_load_ps(node1);
    tmp1 = _mm_load_ps(node2);
    tmp2 = _mm_hadd_ps(tmp0, tmp1);

    tmp0 = _mm_load_ps(node3);
    tmp1 = _mm_load_ps(node4);
    tmp3 = _mm_hadd_ps(tmp0, tmp1);

    tmp0 = _mm_hadd_ps(tmp2, tmp3);

    _mm_store_ps(result, tmp0);
}

void test(float *node1, float *node2, float *node3, float *node4, float *result)
{
    float tmp0[4], tmp1[4], tmp2[4], tmp3[4];
    tmp0[0] = node1[0] + node1[1];
    tmp0[1] = node1[2] + node1[3];
    tmp0[2] = node1[4] + node1[5];
    tmp0[3] = node1[6] + node1[7];

    tmp1[0] = node2[0] + node2[1];
    tmp1[1] = node2[2] + node2[3];
    tmp1[2] = node2[4] + node2[5];
    tmp1[3] = node2[6] + node2[7];

    tmp2[0] = node3[0] + node3[1];
    tmp2[1] = node3[2] + node3[3];
    tmp2[2] = node3[4] + node3[5];
    tmp2[3] = node3[6] + node3[7];

    tmp3[0] = node4[0] + node4[1];
    tmp3[1] = node4[2] + node4[3];
    tmp3[2] = node4[4] + node4[5];
    tmp3[3] = node4[6] + node4[7];

    float l[4], r[4];
    l[0] = tmp0[0] + tmp0[1];
    l[1] = tmp0[2] + tmp0[3];
    l[2] = tmp1[0] + tmp1[1];
    l[3] = tmp1[2] + tmp1[3];

    r[0] = tmp2[0] + tmp2[1];
    r[1] = tmp2[2] + tmp2[3];
    r[2] = tmp3[0] + tmp3[1];
    r[3] = tmp3[2] + tmp3[3];

    result[0] = l[0] + l[1];
    result[1] = l[2] + l[3];
    result[2] = r[0] + r[1];
    result[3] = r[2] + r[3];
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

    int nnodes = 4;
    float *data = new float [nnodes * 8];
    for (int i = 0; i < nnodes * 8; ++i) { data[i] = (i / 8) + 1; /* fprintf(stderr, "data %02d %f\n", i, data[i]); */ }
    double t = clock();
    for (int k = 0; k < 1e+9; ++k) {
        float result[4];
        int off = sizeof(float) * 8;
        test(data, data + 8, data + 16, data + 24, result);
    }
    fprintf(stderr, "%02f (sec)\n", (clock() - t) / (float)CLOCKS_PER_SEC);
            delete [] data;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You could have selected a) better algorithm and b) better mnemonic to do the job. (And is it intentional to only add about one half of the floats?) –  Aki Suihkonen May 3 '13 at 15:21
    
No ;-( I have done a mistake there! Thanks Aki. Let me correct this code and post a new version with the results. –  user18490 May 3 '13 at 15:30
    
Your example code here isn't exactly the best thing for vectorization. I can't tell if you're doing a sum-reduction, but if you are, you're better off using vertical adds instead of horizontal ones. In the general case, the you want to keep your work/memory-access ratio as high as possible. –  Mysticial May 3 '13 at 16:27
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I fixed your code to use SIMD efficiently. Your old method gets 14.1 seconds on my computer and then new method takes 1.2 seconds. I rewrote the code in your test function to make it simpler to read but otherwise it's the same.

The old method stored the nodes in memory like this: node1[0], node1[1],...node1[7], node2[0], node2[1],.... The way you have now is called an Array of Structs (AoS). That's the slow way to use SSE and that's why it's not any better than your scalar code.

The new method which uses SSE store the nodes like this: node1[0], node2[0], node3[0], node4[0], node1[1], node2[1], .... This is called a Struct of Arrays (SoA). That's the efficient way to use SIMD. In general if you're using hadd often (or the dot product instruction) then you probably not using the best algorithm with SIMD.

Here is the code including your old method and my new one. Note, there are several additional ways you could try to make this more efficient, such as unrolling the loop, but now at least the SIMD is being used correctly.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pmmintrin.h>

void test(float *node1, float *node2, float *node3, float *node4, float *result)
{
    result[0] = node1[0] + node1[1] + node1[2] + node1[3] + node1[4] + node1[5] + node1[6] + node1[7];
    result[1] = node2[0] + node2[1] + node2[2] + node2[3] + node2[4] + node2[5] + node2[6] + node2[7];
    result[2] = node3[0] + node3[1] + node3[2] + node3[3] + node3[4] + node3[5] + node3[6] + node3[7];
    result[3] = node4[0] + node4[1] + node4[2] + node4[3] + node4[4] + node4[5] + node4[6] + node4[7];
}

void testSSE(float *nodes_soa, float *result)
{
  __m128 sum = _mm_set1_ps(0.0f);
  for(int i=0; i<8; i++) {
    __m128 tmp0 = _mm_load_ps(nodes_soa + 4*i);
    sum =_mm_add_ps(tmp0, sum);      
  }
  _mm_store_ps(result, sum);
}
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

    int nnodes = 4;
    float *data = new float [nnodes * 8];
    double t;

    //old method using array of structs (AoS)
    for (int i = 0; i < nnodes * 8; ++i) { 
      data[i] = (i / 8) + 1; 
    //  printf("data %02d %f\n", i, data[i]); 
    }

    t = clock();
    for (int k = 0; k < 1e+9; ++k) {
        float result[4];
        int off = sizeof(float) * 8;
        test(data, data + 8, data + 16, data + 24, result);
    //printf("%f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    }
    printf("%02f (sec)\n", (clock() - t) / (float)CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    //new method using struct of arrays (SoA)
    for (int i = 0; i < nnodes * 8; ++i) { 
      data[i] = i%4 + 1; 
      //printf("data %02d %f\n", i, data[i]); 
    }

    t = clock();
    for (int k = 0; k < 1e+9; ++k) {
        float result[4];
        int off = sizeof(float) * 8;
        //test(data, data + 8, data + 16, data + 24, result);
        testSSE(data, result);
    //printf("%f %f %f %f\n", result[0], result[1], result[2], result[3]);
    }
    printf("%02f (sec)\n", (clock() - t) / (float)CLOCKS_PER_SEC);

    delete [] data;
    return 0;
} 

Edit: In general you want to use 16 bit alignment in SSE. Here are the functions I normally used.

inline void* aligned_malloc(size_t size, size_t align) {
    void *result;
    #ifdef _MSC_VER 
    result = _aligned_malloc(size, align);
    #else 
     if(posix_memalign(&result, align, size)) result = 0;
    #endif
    return result;
}

inline void aligned_free(void *ptr) {
    #ifdef _MSC_VER 
        _aligned_free(ptr);
    #else 
      free(ptr);
    #endif

}

Use

//float *data = new float [nnodes * 8];
float *data = (float*) aligned_malloc(nnodes*8*sizeof(float), 16);
share|improve this answer
1  
I would be careful of the assumption that new float [nnodes * 8] returns a block of memory with 16-byte alignment. It's true on some platforms (like OS X), but otherwise _mm_malloc or a similar arrangement might be needed. –  Brett Hale May 4 '13 at 13:51
    
You're right. I was mostly trying to show the main idea. –  user2088790 May 4 '13 at 15:59
    
I added an edit to show how to get aligned memory. –  user2088790 May 4 '13 at 16:07
    
I know it's pedantic:) The main thing is that you've demonstrated AoS vs SoA. It's a good answer. –  Brett Hale May 4 '13 at 16:12
    
Thanks a lot for your help on this. It is very useful! –  user18490 May 17 '13 at 23:33
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Your test is terrible. You're doing so many other things, that have nothing to do with what you're trying to test and measures everything together.

The slowest thing you're doing here is calling new to allocate a new array each time. This is probably the only thing that matters here.

If you want to test SSE, measure only SSE.

Depending on your compiler and the way your code is written, with -O3 it may be using SSE itself to implement your code or maybe even some other command set that fits the job and does it faster.

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't say it's terrible, but yes I agree. I actually took the new/delete out of the loop and don't measure this anymore. The result is the same, there's no major difference. So the question stands regardless of what I measure. –  user18490 May 3 '13 at 15:23
    
Maybe data[i] = i / 8 is taking more than the actual code you're trying to measure. –  selalerer May 3 '13 at 15:26
    
I tried to comment out or move the code that is not relevant, even commenting out the call to the test() function in the loop, and it's the loop itself which seems to take most of the time. So that test doesn't seem to be very valid anyway. –  user18490 May 3 '13 at 15:45
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