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Why does the following program program1,intended to print numbers 1-9 hang and closes abruptly even though it compiles without error?I suspect it has got something to do with the fact that I have used a variable as the index of the integer array arr[].I expect the user to be prompted to enter the size of the array and based on that I fill up that array.Though I can intuitively pinpoint the cause of the problem here is the variable index, I want to know the reason for the following:

Why does the program compile without error or warning if it's faulty?

What is the technical reason why the code is wrong? Can't we use a variable as an array index?Is there a way for it or malloc() is the only solution?

//Program1

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
int n,arr[n],i;
printf("Enter the size of n");
scanf("%d",&n);

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
arr[i]=i;

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
printf("%d\n",arr[i]);
}

I have achieved the same using malloc() in program2 and the program works fine with it.But I want to know the reason why the above program program1 fails,instead of blindly using malloc() just because it's so convenient.

//Program2

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{

int n,*ptr,i;
printf("Enter the size of array\n");
scanf("%d",&n);
ptr=malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
for(i=0;i<n;i++)
ptr[i]=i;

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
printf("%d\n",ptr[i]);

free(ptr);

}
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FYI, clang does warn about this. –  Mat May 3 '13 at 16:22
    
@Mat I have to change the settings of my compiler then.I got no error or warning at all.Can you tell me what warnings your clang gave? –  Thokchom May 3 '13 at 16:24
    
@Mat It would be really helpful if you could tell me what warnings your compiler clang gave about it. –  Thokchom May 3 '13 at 16:28
    
For clang, compiling with -Wmost is a good setting to start with. That turns on a reasonable set of warnings. If you are ambitious, also use -Werror, especially when starting new programs. That turns warnings into errors, forcing you to fix problems before you can proceed. –  Eric Postpischil May 3 '13 at 17:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

int arr[n] says, "Use n to specify the number of elements for this array". However, at that point, the value of the variable n is undefined. I have absolutely no idea why your compiler is letting you get away with that, but Undefined Behaviour is why your program isn't working correctly. Using malloc is the correct way to go in this case.

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1  
The compiler is letting them get away with it because they have not turned warnings on and the compiler defaults to do-what-you-want-see-if-I-care mode. Compilers ought to default to most warnings on and only allow you to turn them off if you have a cryptographically signed certificate from a licensed computer science instructor. :-) –  Eric Postpischil May 3 '13 at 16:39
    
You don't have to use malloc. You could just do the scanf first and then declare int arr[n]. –  bsmartins May 3 '13 at 17:19

You are constructing arr before the size is known. just because you declare n beforehand doesnt mean n has a value.

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int arr[n] is a variable definition. Those are evaluated at compile time, based on the value of n then. The value of n is indeterminate, so the size of the array is kind of random - frankly I'm surprised it compiled, and doubly surprised if it compiled without warnings.

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Declare arr[n] after scanf ....

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Can you format and elaborate on that? –  Felix Frank Oct 21 '14 at 11:33

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