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I have the following class which contains only one field i. Access to this field is guarded by the lock of the object ("this"). When implementing equals() I need to lock this instance (a) and the other (b). If thread 1 calls a.equals(b) and at the same time thread 2 calls b.equals(a), the locking order is reverse in the two implementations and may result in deadlock.

How should I implement equals() for a class which has synchronized fields?

public class Sync {
    // @GuardedBy("this")
    private int i = 0;
    public synchronized int getI() {return i;}
    public synchronized void setI(int i) {this.i = i;}

    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        synchronized (this) {
            result = prime * result + i;
        }
        return result;
    }

    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Sync other = (Sync) obj;
        synchronized (this) {
            synchronized (other) {
                // May deadlock if "other" calls 
                // equals() on "this" at the same 
                // time 
                if (i != other.i)
                    return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
}
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14 Answers 14

Trying to synchronize equals and hashCode inside the object will not work properly. Consider the case of a HashMap that uses hashCode to discover which "bucket" an object will be in, and then uses equals to sequentially search all objects in the bucket.

If objects are allowed to mutate in a way that changes the outcomes of hashCode or equals you could end up with a scenario where HashMap calls hashCode. It acquires the lock, gets the hash and releases the lock again. HashMap then proceeds to compute which "bucket" to use. But before HashMap can acquire the lock on equals someone else grabs the lock and mutates the object so that equals become inconsistent with the previous value of hashCode. This will lead to catastrophic results.

The hashCode and equals methods are used in a lot of places and is core to the Java collections API. I might be valuable to rethink your application structure that do not require synchronized access to these methods. Or at the very least not synchronize on the object itself.

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Why the downvote?? If you look at the classes in the JDK (java.util.Date or java.lang.Long) you'll find that they aren't synchronized either. –  leonm Oct 28 '09 at 10:50
1  
"If objects are allowed to mutate in a way that changes the outcomes of hashCode or equals ..." Most objects do - even java.util.Date (setTime(long)). It's always necessary to keep that in mind when using a hashed data structure - don't change it after you've hashed it. Still, it is allowed to change it. –  sfussenegger Oct 28 '09 at 11:03
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Why synchronise? What is the use case where it matters one if them changes during the comparison and it does not matter if if changes immediately after before code depending on equality runs. (ie if you have code depending on equlity what happens if the values become unequal before or during this code)

I think you have to take a look at the larger process to see where you need to lock.

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You are correct that one value could change immediately after the comparison, but as when the wrapped value is more interesting than a primitive int, there's a possibility of that value being in an inconsistent state unless synchronized while its parts are being examined. –  joel.neely Oct 28 '09 at 11:58
1  
True but you still have the problem of what to do after the equals –  Mark Oct 28 '09 at 12:21
2  
actually, the issue is one of visibility. without using synchronized, a valid ordering could still result in an unexpected result (i.e. a value set earlier is not visible when it should be). –  jtahlborn Sep 12 '11 at 0:48
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Where is the point in synchronizing equals() if the result isn't guaranteed to be true after synchronization was left:

if (o1.equals(o2)) {
  // is o1 still equal to o2?
}

Hence you could simply synchronize calls to getI() inside equals one after another without changing the output - it's simple not valid anymore.

You'll always have to synchronize the whole block:

synchronized(o1) {
  synchronized(o2) {
    if (o1.equals(o2)) {
      // is o1 still equal to o2?
    }
  }
}

Admittedly, you'll still face the same problem, but at least your synchronizing at the right point ;)

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You are attempting to define a content-based "equals" and "hashCode" on a mutable object. This is not only impossible: it doesn't make sense. According to

http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html

both "equals" and "hashCode" need to be consistent: return the same value for successive invocations on the same object(s). Mutability by definition prevents that. This is not just theory: many other classes (eg collections) depend on the objects implementing the correct semantics for equals/hashCode.

The synchronization issue is a red herring here. When you solve the underlying problem (mutability), you won't need to synchronize. If you don't solve the mutability problem, no amount of synchronization will help you.

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Mutable objects from the JVM do implement equals (example: ArrayList, HashMap) so your statement that "content-based "equals" (...) on a mutable object (...) doesn't make sense" is not shared by those writing the JVM. Even some sychronized mutable classes implement equals (example Vector, which is not deadlock safe btw)! –  Philipp Nov 10 '09 at 12:09
1  
That's a good point. However, I'd argue that it's the caller's responsibility to make these objects effectively immutable for the duration of any operation that makes use of equals/hashCode. For example, calling List<ArrayList>.contains(x) while mutating x, or mutating the keys in Map<ArrayList, ?> has undefined behaviour. –  user58804 Nov 11 '09 at 0:11
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(I assume that you're interested in the general case here, and not just in wrapped integers.)

You can't prevent two threads from calling set... methods in arbitrary order. So even when one thread gets a (valid) true from calling .equals(...), that result could be invalidated immediately by another thread that calls set... on one of the objects. IOW the result only means that the values were equal at the instant of comparison.

Therefore, synchronizing would protect against the case of the wrapped value being in an inconsistent state while you are attempting to do the compare (e.g. two int-sized halves of a wrapped long being updated consecutively). You could avoid a race condition by copying each value (i.e. independently synchronized, without overlap) and then comparing the copies.

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The only way to know for sure if synchronization is strictly necessary is to analyze the entire program for situations. There are two things you need to look for; situations where one thread is changing an object while another is calling equals, and situations where the thread calling equals might see a stale value of i.

If you lock both this and the other object at the same time you do indeed risk a deadlock. But I'd question that you need to do this. Instead, I think you should implement equals(Object) like this:

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    Sync other = (Sync) obj;
    return this.getI() == other.getI();
}

This does not guarantee that the two objects have the same value of i at the same time, but that is unlikely to make any practical difference. After all, even if you did have that guarantee, you'd still have to cope with the issue that the two objects might no longer be equal by the time that the equals call returned. (This is @s's point!)

Furthermore, this does not entirely eliminate the risk of deadlock. Consider the case where a thread may call equals while holding a lock on one of the two objects; e.g.

// In same class as above ...
public synchronized void frobbitt(Object other) {
    if (this.equals(other)) {
        ...
    }
}

Now if two threads call a.frobbitt(b) and b.frobbitt(a) respectively, there is a risk of deadlock.

(However, you do need to call getI() or declare i to be volatile, otherwise the equals() could see a stale value of i if it was recently updated by a different thread.)

This having been said, there is something rather worrying about a value-based equals method on an object whose component values may be mutated. For example, this will break many of the collection types. Combine this with multi-threading and you are going to have a lot of difficulty figuring out whether your code is really correct. I cannot help thinking that you would be better off changing the equals and hashcode methods so that they don't depend on state that may mutate after the methods have been called the first time.

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> Furthermore, this does not entirely eliminate the risk of deadlock. Consider the case where a thread may call equals while holding a lock on one of the two objects. I'm not sure how this is a problem. If it's the lock of this, no prob as getI() will be reentrant and will not influence other.getI(). Same thing if it's the other's lock. Just for reference on how others do it: Vector synchronizes on this but not on the other in equals(). This may lead to ConcurrentModificationException if the vector is modified while equals() runs. AtomicInteger does not implement equals() –  Philipp Oct 28 '09 at 12:01
    
@Philipp - you would need two of threads doing this with the same pair of objects in opposite positions to get a deadlock. –  Stephen C Oct 28 '09 at 12:11
    
Will not the this.getI() release its lock before the other.getI() gets called? I don't understand how this could deadlock. –  Philipp Oct 28 '09 at 12:19
    
this.getI() does not acquire or release the lock, because frobbitt() already acquired it before calling this.getI(). This is the same situation as in your question, but with a different method. Two threads calling a.frobitt(b) and b.frobitt(a) at the same time will both acquire the lock for a resp. b, and then wait for the lock for b resp. a in order to call other.getI(), resulting in deadlock. –  Christian Semrau Jul 8 '11 at 19:35
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If it has been said enough, the fields you use for hashCode(), equals() or compareTo() should be immutable, preferably final. In this case you don't need to synchronise them.

The only reason to implement hashCode() is so the object can be added to a hash collection, and you cannot validly change the hashCode() of an object which has been added to such a collection.

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1  
Like the computations for ArrayList? ;-) Joking aside, immutable final is a good thing to strive for (probably beyond a good thing - everything is so much easier when you use immutable objects), but it's not always possible with large composite objects. –  Kevin Day Oct 29 '09 at 4:15
    
How do you use hashCode() with ArrayList? While it might not be possible to make the objects immutable, its doesn't change the fact that you cannot change the hashCode() of a key of a Map or elements of a Set and have it work. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 31 '09 at 7:49
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Always lock them in the same order, one way you could decide the order is on the results of System.identityHashCode(Object)

Edit to include comment:

The best solution to deal with the rare case of the identityHashCodes being equal requires more details about what other locking of those objects is going on.

All multiple object lock requirements should use the same resolution process.

You could create a shared utility to track objects with the same identityHashCode for the short period of the lock requirements, and provide a repeatable ordering for them for the period that they're being tracked.

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public boolean equals(Object obj) { if (this == obj) return true; if (obj == null) return false; if (getClass() != obj.getClass()) return false; Sync other = (Sync) obj; boolean smallerHash = System.identityHashCode(this) < System.identityHashCode(other); synchronized (smallerHash?this:other) { synchronized (smallerHash?other:this) { if (i != other.i) return false; } } return true; } –  Philipp Oct 28 '09 at 12:11
    
System.identityHashCode does not give unique values!! –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 28 '09 at 13:56
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The correct implementation of equals() and hashCode() is required by various things like hashing data structures, and so you have no real option there. From another perspective, equals() and hashCode() are just methods, with the same requirements on synchronization as other methods. You still have the deadlock problem, but it's not specific to the fact that it equals() that's causing it.

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As Jason Day points out, integer compares are already atomic, so synchronizing here is superfluous. But if you were just constructing a simplified example and in real life you're thinking of a more complex object:

The direct answer to your question is, insure that you always compare the items in a consistent order. It doesn't matter what that order is, as long as it's consistent. In a case like this, System.identifyHashCode would provide an ordering, like:

public boolean equals(Object o)
{
  if (this==o)
    return true;
  if (o==null || !o instanceof Sync)
    return false;
  Sync so=(Sync) o;
  if (System.identityHashCode(this)<System.identityHashCode(o))
  {
    synchronized (this)
    {
      synchronized (o)
      {
         return equalsHelper(o);
      }
    }
  }
  else
  {
    synchronized (o)
    {
      synchronized (this)
      {
        return equalsHelper(o);
      }
    }
  }
}

Then declare equalsHelper private and let it do the real work of comparing.

(But wow, that's a lot of code for such a trivial issue.)

Note that for this to work, any function that can change the state of the object would have to be declared synchronized.

Another option would be to synchronize on Sync.class rather than on either object, and then to also synchronize any setters on Sync.class. This would lock everything on a single mutex and avoid the whole problem. Of course, depending on what you're doing this might cause undesired blocking of some threads. You'd have to think through the implications in light of what your program is about.

If this is a real issue in a project you're working on, a serious alternative to consider would be to make the object immutable. Think of String and StringBuilder. You could create a SyncBuilder object that lets you do any work you need to create one of these things, then have a Sync object whose state is set by the constructor and can never change. Create a constructor that takes a SyncBuilder and sets its state to to match or have a SyncBuilder.toSync method. Either way, you do all your building in SyncBuilder, then turn it into a Sync and now you're guaranteed immutability so you don't have to mess with synchronization at all.

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Do not use syncs. Think about unmodifiable beans.

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You need to make sure the objects do not change between the calls to hashCode() and equals() (if called). Then you must assure that the objects do not change (to the extend that hashCode and equals are concerned) while the object sits in a hashmap. To change the object you must first remove it, then change it and put it back.

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As others have mentioned, if things change during the equals check, there is already a possibility of crazy behavior (even with correct synchronization). so, all you really need to worry about is visibility (you want to make sure a change which "happens before" your equals call is visible). therefore, you can just do "snapshot" equals which will be correct in terms of "happens before" relationship and will not suffer from lock ordering problems:

public boolean equals(Object o) {
  // ... standard boilerplate here ...

  // take a "snapshot" (acquire and release each lock in turn)
  int myI = getI();
  int otherI = ((Sync)o).getI();

  // and compare (no locks held at this point)
  return myI == otherI;
}
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Reads and writes to int variables are already atomic, so there is no need to synchronize the getter and setter (see http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/essential/concurrency/atomic.html).

Likewise, you don't need to synchronize equals here. While you could prevent another thread from changing one of the i values during comparison, that thread would simply block until the equals method completes and change it immediately afterwards.

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