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And I cannot find anything wrong with my code but the compiler keeps complaining at me. It says Error:33:19 expected ';' or ',' or ')' before numeric constant.
It driving me nuts heres a snippet of the line its pointing at. Its in bold. If you guys could help me out. That would be great thanks. BTW im trying to make the game of life. I know the curly braces are messed up at the end. I just want to know whats wrong with line 33. Its the line with Astricks around it. The void initGrid(int ROWS, int COLUMNS, int g[ROWS][COLUMNS])

int getUserInput();
void initGrid(int, int, int[ROWS][COLUMNS]);
void processGeneration(int, int, int[ROWS][COLUMNS]);
int countNeighbors(int, int, int[ROWS][COLUMNS], int, int);
void printtoGrid(int, int, int[ROWS][COLUMNS]);
void sleep(unsigned int);

int main()
{
return 0;
}
//*************
int getUserInput()
{
int g;
printf("Thanks for playing!\n");
printf("How many generations do you want to watch: ");
scanf("%d", &g);
return g;
}
//********************
 **void initGrid(int ROWS, int COLUMNS, int g[ROWS][COLUMNS])**
{

 int i, j, k;
 for(i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
{
    for(j = 0; j < COLUMNS; j++)
  {
  /*
  [-1][-1][-1][-1][-1]
  [-1][  ][  ][  ][-1]
  [-1][  ][  ][  ][-1]
  [-1][-1][-1][-1][-1]

  */
    if(i == 0 || i == (ROWS - 1) || j == 0 || j == (COLUMNS - 1))
    g[i][j] = -1;

      else
     {
      k = rand() % 3;

      if(k == 0)
      {
        g[i][j] = 1;
        population++;
      }
      else g[i][j] = 0;

     }

} }

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2  
Which line is line 33? –  FDinoff May 3 '13 at 17:40
1  
why don't you post all of your code so we can try and compile it instead of a partial snippet. –  ChrisCM May 3 '13 at 17:41
    
what is ROWS and COLUMNS ? –  karthikr May 3 '13 at 17:42
    
Oh wait line 33 is the function prototype. –  FDinoff May 3 '13 at 17:43
2  
"Error:33:19 expected ';' or ',' or ')' before numeric constant." <- Read the message. You have a numeric constant where there shouldn't be one. If you look at that line in your code, there isn't a manifest numeric constant there. Hence: Something must be replaced there by the preprocessor with a numeric constant. Hence: Look at the #defines. And post them. That could avoid several wrong guesses as to what the problem is. –  Daniel Fischer May 3 '13 at 18:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The C language doesn't support passing to a function an array parameter whose size is given in another parameter. So try changing:

void InitGrid(int ROWS, int COLUMNS, int g[ROWS][COLUMNS])

to:

void InitGrid(int ROWS, int COLUMNS, int* g)

Since the compiler needs to know the dimension sizes of an array at compile-time in order to support multiple dimensions, you'll need to change the code that accesses g to compute the index at runtime instead -- change:

g[i][j] = -1;

to:

g[i*COLUMNS+j] = -1;

[Edit - in case ROWS and COLUMNS are #defined as @FDinoff suggests]

If ROWS and COLUMNS are #defines, they are hard-coded constants and it doesn't make sense to try passing them as parameters – try this:

void InitGrid(int g[ROWS][COLUMNS])
share|improve this answer
    
still saying the same thing after i changed it –  Snewman8771 May 3 '13 at 18:01
    
Probably then you have defined ROWS and COLUMNS as preprocessor macros, as @FDinoff suggested, and points out this will not work, trying to pass those as parameters. Just remove them and try void InitGrid(int g[ROWS][COLUMNS]). Updating my answer to say the same. –  Richard Walters May 3 '13 at 18:06
    
k your right. Sorry I am new. Watching Wibit.net. I guess they were using a older compiler or something. Thanks A LOT Richard! –  Snewman8771 May 3 '13 at 18:16
    
No problem, and don't worry, everyone's new at some point! :) –  Richard Walters May 3 '13 at 19:49

Most likely the c preprocessor expanded int ROWS to be what ever ROWS is defined as.

if ROWS is defined as 4

void InitGrid(int ROWS, int COLUMNS, int g[ROWS][COLUMNS])

would turn into

void InitGrid(int 4, int COLUMNS, int g[4][COLUMNS])

Since int 4 is a syntax error so you need to provide a different variable name (such as row) so the preprocessor doesn't expand it.

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Sounds like ROWS is a constant defined somewhere (in scope).

Without knowing if ROWS is defined in a header somewhere, I would try a different variable name instead of ROWS.

For exmple:

void initGrid(int rowCount, int COLUMNS, int g[ROWS][COLUMNS])
{

   int i, j, k;
   for(i = 0; i < rowCount; i++)
   {
      for(j = 0; j < COLUMNS; j++)
      {
       ...

However, if that will likely only move the issue. If ROWS is a constant, I would assume COLUMNS is also, so changing COLUMNS to something like columnCount would help there.

And finally, as mentioned elsewhere, trying to use int g[ROWS][COLUMNS] will be problematic as well. Passing int *g will do the trick.

The end result would look something like

void initGrid(int rowCount, int columnCount, int *g)

If ROWS and COLUMNS are constants, you could not pass them in the function prototype at all and just use them in the for loops like you had:

void initGrid(int *g)
{

   int i, j, k;
   for(i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
   {
      for(j = 0; j < COLUMNS; j++)
      { 
       ...

However, if you want the function to be more generic, I wouldn't go that direction.

share|improve this answer
    
I have pondered for a long time whether to upvote the answer. While it is correct, it is too brief to be truly useful. Those who understand this answer would probably already have understood the error message. You need to explain more, so that the answer helps somebody who doesn't understand the error message. –  Daniel Fischer May 3 '13 at 18:12
    
Thanks for the feedback Daniel. I hope to get the hang of this to help improve a resource I've found invaluable. –  cebarth May 3 '13 at 18:24
    
I'm sure you will. It looks like you know your stuff and can diagnose problems with scarce information. (And you can still edit the answer to make it more comprehensive, if you wish.) –  Daniel Fischer May 3 '13 at 18:30

You're missing several braces. Corrected version;

void InitGrid(int ROWS, int COLUMNS, int g[ROWS][COLUMNS])
{

   int i, j, k;


  for(i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
  {
      for(j = 0; j < COLUMNS; j++)
      {  

       /*
      [-1][-1][-1][-1][-1]
      [-1][  ][  ][  ][-1]
      [-1][  ][  ][  ][-1]
      [-1][-1][-1][-1][-1]

      */
           if(i == 0 || i == (ROWS - 1) || j == 0 || j == (COLUMNS - 1))
           {
                g[i][j] = -1;
            }
        }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You missed the top of the function -- he didn't indent it properly so you may have missed it: void InitGrid(int ROWS, int COLUMNS, int g[ROWS][COLUMNS]). This is why he gets a compiler error -- trying to use a parameter as the length of another parameter doesn't work in C. –  Richard Walters May 3 '13 at 17:48
    
@RichardWalters edited. Clearly his definition is wrong too and should have been in my answer, but I think that's been thoroughly explained now. –  evanmcdonnal May 3 '13 at 17:53
    
ok so I posted the full code. The thing in the middle is whats wrong with it. The void initgrid(int ROWS, int columns, int g[rows][columns]) it keeps pointing to that –  Snewman8771 May 3 '13 at 17:54
    
You were correct about the braces; however, he has updated his question to show the braces (although not formatted quite perfectly). –  Richard Walters May 3 '13 at 17:56
    
sorry the braces are right. trust me. lol. –  Snewman8771 May 3 '13 at 18:01

Your function prototypes in the first few lines should be ... int, int, int[][] ...

In other words, leave out the ROWS and COLUMNS in lines 2,3,4, and 5 of your code.

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