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I have developed an application in java. I need that my java program would not terminated any process explorer/task manager.

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Why do you want to achieve this? –  KB22 Oct 28 '09 at 10:52
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Being able to do this would be a security hole the size of the moon. Essentially, you would be able to wreck computers easily. –  user44242 Oct 28 '09 at 11:03
    
Avast process is doing what i am expected so why it is not by java program –  Mayan Alagar Pandi Oct 28 '09 at 11:19
    
Is Avast terminating some program you're trying to develop? You could just disable Avast temporarily, but there might be something your program does that Avast finds highly suspicious/potentially damaging. –  Nick T Oct 28 '09 at 13:32
    
The JVM would have to be started with (at least) root privileges which is a no-no in most shared servers. I wouldn't want an unkillable JVM running on my own machine either. –  Andy Gherna Oct 28 '09 at 13:33
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7 Answers

As others have said, this is not possible. Raymond Chen of Microsoft has given a good explanation as to why.

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Not possible...

There maybe ways to hide it from Task Manager or even other proprietary process explorers for windows but that needs access to the native win32 API.

Maybe you can use JNI(Java Native Interface) to achieve this but I am still skeptical.

& plus JVM itself is a process which can of-course be killed.

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Hi Asad Khan, I am searching about at online. They are giving do it by VC++ or RootKit or add DENY handle. But i don't know how to use it for my java progrm. If you know about any one of three kindly reply me. Thanks & Regards Mayan Alagar –  Mayan Alagar Pandi Oct 28 '09 at 11:05
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So - you are asking for advice on how to build a rootkit... and you honestly expected an answer? –  Andrzej Doyle Oct 29 '09 at 17:28
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Even if this were possible, you should not even want (let alone "need") to do this.

The only thing it could achieve is piss off users and perhaps cause legal trouble. There is no legitimate reason to do it, so don't.

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I believe it is not possible.

The OS should always be able to manage the application, which could involve terminating them.

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You might take a look at rmid. I think you can make it automatically restart your service whenever it went down. As far as I recall, this is what was used in Jini a lot.

(So this would give you an external watch dog, based on Java tools only. Question of course is what you are going to do when rmid itself dies. I guess do something clever with cron. But what if cron dies? And so on and so forth.)

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This is not possible.

The closest you're able to achieve is to add a shut-down hook to your Java program that will block indefinitely; e.g. Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(Thread).

This will have the affect that a normal kill signal under Posix will have no effect. From Windows task manager an attempt to "End Process" will fail and Windows will eventually prompt stating that the process is unresponsive and would you like to terminate it - At this point there is no way to prevent the termination.

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Hi Adamski, I am searching about at online. They are giving do it by VC++ or RootKit or add DENY handle. But i don't know how to use it for my java progrm. If you know about any one of three kindly reply me. Thanks & Regards Mayan Alagar –  Mayan Alagar Pandi Oct 28 '09 at 11:06
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It's possible in VC++ and other languages because you have the ability to hook directly into the OS itself. Java programs are always going through the JVM as an intermediate layer and if you were able to hook that deeply into someone's machine via JVM, as people have said, it would be an immense security hole:

Short version: If you absolutely must do that, do it in a language that compiles native binaries and has no VM between you and the OS API.

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