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I'm trying to setup Mercurial on IIS 7.5. I have a web.config for an application directory that is ignoring the maxAllowedContentLength attribute and I simply cannot get IIS to accept it! I've tried it a thousand different ways at global, local, and every level. It sticks by its default of 30MB and refuses to let me push changesets that are larger than that. It doesn't even close the connection, it just gets to 30MB and stalls completely. It's not a timeout issue, I've tried pushing from the local machine to its IP address.

What the hell is going on?

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
    <system.webServer>
        <handlers>
            <add name="Python" path="*.cgi" verb="*" modules="CgiModule" scriptProcessor="C:\Python27\python.exe -u &quot;%s&quot;" resourceType="Unspecified" requireAccess="Script" />
        </handlers>
        <security>
            <requestFiltering>
                <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" />
            </requestFiltering>
        </security>
        <rewrite>
            <rules>
                <rule name="rewrite to hgwebdir" patternSyntax="Wildcard">
                    <match url="*" />
                    <conditions logicalGrouping="MatchAll" trackAllCaptures="false">
                        <add input="{REQUEST_FILENAME}" matchType="IsFile" negate="true" />
                    </conditions>
                    <action type="Rewrite" url="hgweb.cgi/{R:1}" />
                </rule>
            </rules>
        </rewrite>
    </system.webServer>

    <!-- I don't know if this is supposed to work... it doesn't matter where I put the settings. -->        
    <location path="*">
      <system.web>
        <!-- maxRequestLength is in kilobytes (KB)  -->
        <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" /> <!-- 1GB -->
      </system.web>
      <system.webServer>
        <security>
          <requestFiltering>
            <!-- maxAllowedContentLength is in bytes (B)  -->
            <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824"/> <!-- 1GB -->
          </requestFiltering>
        </security>
      </system.webServer>
    </location>
</configuration>
share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I found a few ways of dealing with this issue:

To fix this server-side in IIS, download and install https://www.nartac.com/Products/IISCrypto/Default.aspx and click the BEAST button, or force SSL3.0 by disabling other protocols.

If you don't have access to the IIS server, you can fix it by rolling back Python to version 2.7.2 or earlier.

If you are adventurous, you can modify the mercurial source in sslutil.py, near the top, change the line

sslsocket = ssl.wrap_socket(sock, keyfile, certfile,
            cert_reqs=cert_reqs, ca_certs=ca_certs)

to

from _ssl import PROTOCOL_SSLv3
sslsocket = ssl.wrap_socket(sock, keyfile, certfile,
            cert_reqs=cert_reqs, ca_certs=ca_certs, ssl_version=PROTOCOL_SSLv3)

This will work around the problem and fix the push limit to mercurial behind IIS.

If you are interested in why Python 2.7.3 broke this, look at http://bugs.python.org/issue13885 for the explanation (it is security-related). If you want to modify Python itself, in Modules/_ssl.c change the line

SSL_CTX_set_options(self->ctx,
                    SSL_OP_ALL & ~SSL_OP_DONT_INSERT_EMPTY_FRAGMENTS);

back to how it was prior to 2.7.3:

SSL_CTX_set_options(self->ctx, SSL_OP_ALL);

Compile and reinstall python, etc. This adds more SSL compatibility at the expense of potential security risks, if I understand the OpenSSL docs correctly.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is a complete fix without requiring client-side changes. Excellent! – jocull May 10 '13 at 15:52
    
Thank you so much for posting this! I've been stuck on issues with largefiles for a few days now and this finally fixed it! – Peter Bernier Jun 28 '13 at 19:36
1  
Even after installing the software above and forcing SSL 3.0, I am still unable to push changes that are larger then 30MB on IIS hosted mercurial. Can someone help? – Sahil Jan 31 '14 at 15:33
    
@Sahil - I think the fix depends on cipher selection too, not just protocol. And when I said "force SSL 3.0", I think I meant disable anything less than 3.0. Also, it looks like the IIS crypto software has been updated since this post. Try playing with the settings - first press the "Best Practices" button, apply, reboot, test, if that doesn't work, try the "PCI" button, apply, reboot, test. Let me know if one of these buttons works and I will update my answer. – roengraft Feb 2 '14 at 13:01
    
I already had it on the best setting. I don't think "PCI" setting will work either. I will give it a go later and will let you know the result. – Sahil Feb 3 '14 at 12:41

Like others, the accepted answer didn't work for me.

The reason the upload fails appears to have to do with an incompatibility in the cipher suite that is negotiated between Mercurial and IIS - specifically, with IIS' default settings, the choice of a CBC-based cipher suite.

Mercurial version 2.9.1 (the one I've tested) sends this cipher suite order to the server. The suites supported by Windows Server 2008 R2 (and IIS 7.5) with an RSA certificate are bold here:

  • TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_SHA
  • TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_SHA
  • TLS_RSA_AES_256_SHA
  • SSL_DHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_SHA
  • SSL_DHE_DSS_WITH_3DES_EDE_SHA
  • SSL_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_SHA
  • TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_SHA
  • TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_SHA
  • TLS_RSA_AES_128_SHA
  • SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA
  • SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_MD5

Only two of those aren't CBC - the RC4 based ones. IIS will pick anything coming before those in both its own and Mercurial's priorities.

The reason IISCrypto 1.3 worked to fix the issue seems not to be that it disabled SSL 2 (although that's still a good idea), but because it moved RC4 above the CBC cipher suites, due to the BEAST attack. In 1.4, RC4 was moved down again, due to newly found vulnerabilities.

So... The best compromise seems to be to move IIS' priority for RC4_128_SHA up above AES_256_SHA. Note that the merits of AES 256 over AES 128 in terms of security are widely debated.

Security-wise, this still prioritizes all the ECDHE CBC ciphers, which Mercurial doesn't support at the moment, but all modern browsers do. IE running on Windows XP as well as Android 2.3 will be using RC4 due to this change - the rest are covered. While RC4 is broken, an attack on it isn't trivial. For my purposes, I think I'll survive. Any user of this method will have to make up their own mind as to whether they'll risk it. :-)

It's still a compromise, and I'm not at all happy about it, but at least I found a workable (and working) compromise. Now if only there was a way to pick cipher suite order on a per-website basis rather than globally on the server...

Thanks to @Sahil for pointing me in the direction of this.

share|improve this answer
    
So in order to not have to compromise, what needs to be "fixed"? Mercurial? IIS? Python? Where should I log a bug, if there's not already one logged? – mo. Jun 24 '14 at 14:10

In My case I had to make more changes in the IISCrypto software referenced above.

I have IIS 7.5 and IISCrypto version 1.4 (latest at time of writing)

Changing to "Best" or "PCI" profile did not work for me so I did following.

  • Changed the profile back to Best option.
  • Look for the bottom left corner box named SSL Cipher Suite Order.
  • Disable/Uncheck all CBC-based ciphers
  • Restart your computer/Server

I found a solution from this thread and an answer from Zach Mason worked for me as described above.

Hope this helps someone.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, this fixes the problem, where just disabling anything below SSLv3 doesn't. However, I'm not sure I'm comfortable disabling every single CBC-based cipher, considering other TLS/SSL websites are running on the same server in my case. Still haven't found a proper solution for this. – JimmiTh Mar 30 '14 at 20:58

As explained in this rant, IIS 7.5 introduces a default setting for maxAllowedContentLength in Machine.config, which will apparently take precedence over whatever you specify in any Web.config.

To fix this, open IIS Manager, click the server node, choose Configuration Editor, and expand system.webServer/security/requestFiltering and then change requestLimits/maxAllowedContentLength (which happens to default to 30000000 bytes). Remember to click Apply afterwards.

share|improve this answer

This is an incompatibility in the SSL module of Python 2.7.3+.

Bug documented here on the TortoiseHg site, but it applies to all platforms pushing into IIS over HTTPS.

https://bitbucket.org/tortoisehg/thg/issue/2593/cant-push-over-30mb-to-iis-via-https

share|improve this answer

I have the same setup running, and I needed to add the maxAllowedContentLength attribute today.
I just inserted it at the bottom of my existing web.config, and it worked at once without problems (with a >100MB commit).

My complete web.config looks like this now:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
    <system.webServer>
        <handlers>
            <add name="Python" path="*.cgi" verb="*" modules="CgiModule" scriptProcessor="C:\Python26\python.exe -u &quot;%s&quot;" resourceType="Unspecified" />
        </handlers>
        <rewrite>
            <rules>
                <rule name="rewrite to hgwebdir" patternSyntax="Wildcard">
                    <match url="*" />
                    <conditions logicalGrouping="MatchAll" trackAllCaptures="false">
                        <add input="{REQUEST_FILENAME}" matchType="IsFile" negate="true" />
                    </conditions>
                    <action type="Rewrite" url="hgweb.cgi/{R:1}" />
                </rule>
            </rules>
        </rewrite>
        <security>
            <requestFiltering>
                <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="2147482624" />
            </requestFiltering>
        </security>
    </system.webServer>
</configuration>
share|improve this answer
    
That's the same attribute I have set above, but it still doesn't work. Have you tried pushing large commits over HTTPS? Mine is fine with HTTP. – jocull May 8 '13 at 12:14
1  
No, I didn't try HTTPS. We're using HTTP only (it's an internal server). – Christian Specht May 8 '13 at 13:12
    
It'd be really helpful for me if you would self-sign a cert real quick and try it over HTTPS. I want to know if I'm crazy or if this is a true IIS bug - which I think it is. Self signing just takes seconds: weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2007/04/06/… – jocull May 8 '13 at 13:44
1  
When pushing via https, I experienced the same as you did: it gets to 30 MB and then doesn't continue. However, after waiting a few minutes, it continues to 60 MB and then waits again. After some more time, I got this: URLError: [Errno 10054] An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host [command returned code 255...]. I won't investigate further now, but there are probably some timeout settings in IIS that can be increased. At least I was able to push more than 30 MB. – Christian Specht May 8 '13 at 14:08
    
Yes! Exactly! My guess is that the default timeout is 120 seconds (2 minutes) and Hg is retrying after being killed once - that is why you see it go to 60MB. It's two chunks of 30MB. – jocull May 8 '13 at 14:15

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