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Is there a rule of thumb to follow for error catching while setting attributes of an object? Let's say for example that you have a Shape class as follows:

class Shape():
    def __init__(self, size):
        self.size = size

I can do the following:

>>> s = Shape(3)

>>> s.size

3

>>> s.size = "hello"

>>> s.size

'hello'

But what if the attribute must be numeric? How do I catch TypeErrors in this situation? Do I put a try/except inside the init definition? This is my guess:

class Shape():
def __init__(self, size):
    try:
        float(size)
        self.size = size
    except:
        raise TypeError, "Value must be numeric"

This will catch the error on initialization but not when setting the attribute. How do I catch a TypeError when the user tries s.size = "hello" ?

Thank you!

I tried implementing the answer below and it didn't work:

class Shape():
def __init(self, size):
    self.size = size

@property
def size(self):
    return self._size

@size.setter
def size(self, value):
    self._size = float(value)

I get the following error message:

Traceback (most recent call last): File "python_playground.py", line 18, in

print s.size   File "python_playground.py", line 9, in size

return self._size AttributeError: Shape instance has no attribute '_size'
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marked as duplicate by karthikr, Rohan, tkanzakic, Soner Gönül, Thor May 4 '13 at 11:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You don't need to use try/except here because float(shape) already raises a perfectly cromulent exception if the value given can't be converted to a float. –  kindall May 3 '13 at 19:45
    
Your __init__(self, size) looks incorrectly specified. –  pcurry May 3 '13 at 20:22

1 Answer 1

To validate instance attributes, use properties.

class Shape():

    @property
    def size(self):
        return self._size

    @size.setter
    def size(self, value):
        self._size = float(value)

Now your __init__() method doesn't need to check the values explicitly (because the properties will do that from __init__() just as well as from anywhere else) and you also get the value checking everywhere else some code tries to set that attribute.

As I noted in a comment on your question, there's no need to use try/except here; you'd just be catching one exception to raise another. float("hello") already gives you a perfectly reasonable ValueError: could not convert string to float: 'hello'.

(Of course you now have that _size attribute hanging out unprotected, but it's not possible to truly protect attributes in Python.)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry for the confusion but I meant to say class Shape(): def __init__(self, size): with an attribute of "size" not "shape". I implented your idea and it isn't working. –  Jason Lillywhite May 3 '13 at 20:13
    
It "isn't working"? Could you be slightly more specific? The code I presented contains no syntax errors and works as described. (I also edited it to use size rather than shape as the attribute.) –  kindall May 3 '13 at 20:38
    
I used that code and do s = Shape() then do s.size and get this error: Shape instance has no attribute '_size' –  Jason Lillywhite May 4 '13 at 2:38
    
Yes, you have to set it first... I would have thought that would be obvious? –  kindall May 4 '13 at 4:48

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