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I need to instantiate few classes through the Java reflection api and invoke 'a' method (method invocation not through reflection) in the instantiated class. I know the reflection do impact the application performance, but I am not very sure how much it hits on the web-environment! Like the Struts framework that instantiates the Action classes using the reflection, my framework too gets the class name as string configured in the file, which I read and instantiate on different requests. How about the idea of having only one instance per class and invoke its method for every requests? example,

package com.app.events;
public class event1 implements iEvent {
     public event1() {
     }

     public void doprocess(Object info) {
        // do necessary events
     }
}
package com.app.events;
public class event2 implements iEvent {
     public event1() {
     }

     public void doprocess(Object info) {
        // do necessary events
     }
}

config.xml
<events>
  <event>com.app.events.Event2</event>
  <event>com.app.events.Event1</event>
</events>
// servlet init
String clazName = parseXMLFile(); // not every time but only once, I have the bean
Class claz = Class.forName(clazName);

// how about this?
// I save this instance for later requests
events.put(request.getParameter("event"), claz.newInstance());

// later requests,I retrieve the event from the map and invoke its method, 
// just a rough code...
events.get(request.getParameter("event")).doprocess(info);
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, start by respecting the Java naming conventions. Classes are CamelCased and methods are camelCased.

Using a single instance is perfectly fine. That's what servlets do, as well as Struts1 actions, and Spring beans (by default) for example. But this should be documented, because it forces every implementation of your interface to be thread-safe (preferrably, by being stateless), unless your framework makes sure only one thread uses each instance at a time, which would considerably reduce the performance of your application.

Creating many instances used to be slow, many years ago. It's not anymore now, so I would create a new instance every time, unless having a single instance is important (because initializing an instance might be slow).

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