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I have a class.

DataMapper<TDalType, TFieldType> : DataMapperBase

For a particular entity, I have a

ObjectADataMapper<TFieldType> : DataMapper<ObjectADal, TFieldType>

I then have an instance of a DataMapperBase and need to determine if it is an entity that is a version of ObjectADataMapper (with any value of TFieldType).

share|improve this question
    
What if you have DerivedObjectADataMapper<T> : ObjectADataMapper<T>, would you still want this to be picked up or only direct instances of ObjectADataMapper? – Chris Sinclair May 3 '13 at 20:21
    
@ChrisSinclair - I don't believe there should be an additional level of derivation, however any level of derivation should work probably. – AJ Henderson May 3 '13 at 20:28
    
possible duplicate of Check if a class is derived from a generic class – AJ Henderson May 3 '13 at 20:31
    
I've voted to close this as duplicate of something else I had found earlier and was unsure how to use. I was missing the fact that I could do something like "typeof(ObjectADataMapper<>)". – AJ Henderson May 3 '13 at 20:32
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can check this by seeing if the object's type is generic and if the corresponding generic template is the generic template that you are looking for. For example:

var type = obj.GetType();
bool isObjectADataMapper = type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(ObjectADataMapper<>);

Or, in a reusable way

  bool IsInstanceOfGenericTypeClosingTemplate(object obj, Type genericTypeDefinition){ 
      if(obj == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("obj");
      if(genericTypeDefinition== null) throw new ArgumentNullException("genericTypeDefinition");
      if(!genericTypeDefinition.IsGenericTypeDefinition) throw new ArgumentException("Must be a generic type definition.", "genericTypeDefinition");
      Type type = obj.GetType(); 
      return type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericTypeDefinition;
  }

You could even take this further and see if the type is derived from the generic type definition in question. For example, consider that you have:

  public class StringDataMapper : ObjectADataMapper<string>
  { 
     // .... whatever
  }

In this case the method I provided would fail. So you'd have to do something like

  bool IsInstanceOfGenericTypeClosingTemplateOrSubclassThereof(object obj, Type genericTypeDefinition){ 
      if(obj == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("obj");
      if(genericTypeDefinition== null) throw new ArgumentNullException("genericTypeDefinition");
      if(!genericTypeDefinition.IsGenericTypeDefinition) throw new ArgumentException("Must be a generic type definition.", "genericTypeDefinition");

      Type type = obj.GetType();
      while ( type != typeof(object) )
      {
         if(type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericTypeDefinition) 
         {
            return true;
         }
         type = type.BaseType;
      } 
      return false;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
@ChrisSinclair, the "clever" way is to use an abstract non-generic base with an internal ctor, and only let the generic type definition in question inherit from it. Then you can do is ObjectADataMapperBase, and know safely that any concrete type must implement the generic ObjectADataMapper<>. Alternatively, you could use metadata (e.g. use an internal attribute, decorate the generic type definition with that attribute, and write a public extension method that tells whether the type has that attribute.) – smartcaveman May 3 '13 at 20:36

you need to get an instance of the type like so:

var typeToTestFor = typeof(ObjectADataMapper<>);

and a generic type for the object being tested

var typeOfObject being tested = objectBeingTested.GetType().GetGenericTypeDefinition();

together you can do the following

public bool IsObjectADataMapper(DataMapperBase base) {
  var typeUnderTest = base.GetType();
  if (!typeUnderTest.IsGenericType())
    return false; // its not generic so it can't match
  var typeToTestFor = typeof(ObjectADataMapper<>);
  return typeToTestFor.Equals(typeUnderTest.GetGenericTyepDefinition());
}
share|improve this answer

You can use is

if(obj is DataMapper)
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work because I need to know if it is a version of ObjectADataMapper, not any DataMapper. It could be an ObjectBDataMapper or an ObjectCDataMapper (or any other object) in which case the check should fail. – AJ Henderson May 3 '13 at 20:19

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