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I have a vector of class pointers std::vector<Square*> listSquares. I want to sort it with one of the attributes of the class as the key. This is what I'm doing

bool compById(Square* a, Square* b)
{
    return a->getId() < b->getId();
}

std::sort(listSquares.begin(), listSquares.end(), compById)

but the compiler says: error: no matching function for call to 'sort(std::vector::iterator, std::vector::iterator, <unresolved overloaded function type>)'

what am I doing wrong here?

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4  
If you can use C++11, you should make this a lambda: std::sort(listSquares.begin(), listSquares.end(), [](Square* a, Square* b){return a->getId() < b->getId;}). –  leftaroundabout May 3 '13 at 20:28
2  
Make sure you actually want pointers and not just objects, too. –  chris May 3 '13 at 20:30
    
I can't use C++11. @chris I'm sure I want to use pointers. –  qutab May 3 '13 at 20:37
    
@qutab have you declared compById inside a class or outside? It should be outside. –  john May 3 '13 at 20:38
    
@john, I've declared it inside the class as a private member function. –  qutab May 3 '13 at 20:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In order to use compById as a parameter to std::sort it should not be a member function. This is wrong

class Square
{
    bool compById(Square* a, Square* b)
    {
        return a->getId() < b->getId();
    }
    ...
};

This is better,

class Square
{
    ...
};

bool compById(Square* a, Square* b)
{
    return a->getId() < b->getId();
}
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Thank you so much. This was the problem. But why can't we declare it as a member function? Actually I'm using it in a different class than square itself. –  qutab May 3 '13 at 20:47
2  
Because how would std::sort know which object to use when it calls the member function? Member functions can only be called on objects, but std::sort has no context to determine which object that should be. Presumably you are calling std::sort from inside some object, but you aren't passing that object to std::sort. std::sort knows nothing about where it's being called from, all it knows are the three parameters you pass to it. –  john May 3 '13 at 20:49
1  
+1 for telepathy skill –  Basilevs May 4 '13 at 8:10

The most important part you're missing is that the arguments to the compare function are const. Another is the return type. If you leave out the return type when declaring a function, the compiler will assume it returns int which is not correct in this case.

And of course the comparison function has to be in scope when you call the std::sort function.

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Even if I use const, I get the same error. In this case I also get, gameplay.cpp:911: error: passing 'const Square' as 'this' argument of 'int Square::getId()' discards qualifiers [-fpermissive] –  qutab May 3 '13 at 20:36
1  
@qutab, you have to make getId() a const member function, too. –  richselian May 3 '13 at 20:43

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