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Any clue on what the easiest way to read the system sound level is?

I'm planning on creating an equalizer made out of short led strips and hooking them up to an Arduino or RaspberryPi. I've seen a lot of examples how to do it with the input, mic or such but not that much with the overall output. At this point I can't care about program specific or system wide, I'm happy when I actually get readings. Any advise would be welcome.

-- EDIT --

based on How get sound input from microphone in python, and process it on the fly? I changed the PCM_CAPTURE to PCM_PLAYBACK which results in python saying read is not possible on the output/playback.

I'm now attempting to create a loopback device, the idea is to pipe the playback back to a separate capture and read it then but no luck so far and I don't know how neat/clean this way is. I can't really imagine that this is the way to go.

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Please add more information on what you've attempted so far. –  Luceos May 6 '13 at 14:46
    
based on stackoverflow.com/questions/1936828/… I changed the PCM_CAPTURE to PCM_PLAYBACK which results in python saying read is not possible on the output/playback. I'm now attempting to create a loopback device, the idea is to pipe the playback back to a separate capture and read it then but no luck so far and I don't know how neat/clean this way is. I can't really imagine that this is the way to go. –  PvdL May 6 '13 at 14:50
    
Please update your question instead of commenting to it when possible. This way new readers can more easily analyse the issue and answer. –  Luceos May 6 '13 at 15:20

2 Answers 2

Somebody achieved exactly this using Python and PulseAudio, see this blog posting. The author wrote a script that polls the system-wide peak sound level to feed this to a VU-meter. He also made the source available on Bitbucket, here.

I've tested it on Ubuntu and it works for me (though only from the command line, not in an interactive Python session). Some extra work involved is installing a ctypes PulseAudio wrapper for the interfacing with Python (link in source) and maybe setting the SINK_NAME to the correct value in the script.

What I gather from the blog PulseAudio is very well suited for this job, but maybe there are better ways.

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I have seen this and tested it but it didn't work great. With my sink name in place I only get 0's. After setting up a combined device with pulseaudio pref program (paman) on Ubuntu I was able to read something. Strange this was, even with paman I wasn't able to read out the sound level on almost any device except the combined devices. I am going to try this on different setups but I haven't had the time yet. –  PvdL May 14 '13 at 7:20
    
If you want to go with PulseAudio, it seems a prerequisite that pavumeter shows the volume of the sound that you're playing. Are you sure your sound plays through Pulse and not directly to Alsa or something? –  moarningsun May 16 '13 at 14:30
    
Yes, I am but even if something is actually wrong with my system (which may very well be) I can access multiple systems with different setups to test this –  PvdL May 16 '13 at 15:14

Almost any sort of sound mixer (software or hardware) should be able to reroute sound output to input. For Windows there's the built-in Stereo Mix, and for Linux there are several solutions (I have heard good things about PulseAudio, but I can't testify myself - some of the steps in this tutorial may help).

That way you can route it to Python - the examples of reading microphone levels you have read should then work just as well.

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From my understanding pulseaudio is a software layer on top of alsa and not every distro uses pulse but must of them do use alsa. Since I would like to be able to run it on a RasberryPi with XBMC as well alsa is the way to go I think. –  PvdL May 4 '13 at 17:49

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