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Suppose file1 looks like this:

bye bye
hello
thank you

And file2 looks like this:

chao
hola
gracias

The desired output is this:

bye bye chao
hello hola
thank you gracias

I myself have already come up with five different approaches to solve this problem. But I think there must be more ways, probably more concise and more elegant ways, and I hope I can learn more cool stuff :)

The following is what I have tried so far, based on what I've learnt from the many solutions of my previous problems. Also, I'm trying to sort of digest or internalize the knowledge I've acquired from the Llama book.

Code 1:

#!perl
use autodie;
use warnings;
use strict;

open my $file1,'<','c:/file1.txt';
open my $file2,'<','c:/file2.txt';

while(defined(my $line1 = <$file1>)
        and defined(my $line2 = <$file2>)){
    die "Files are different sizes!\n" unless eof(file1) == eof(file2);
    $line1 .= $line2;
    $line1 =~ s/\n/ /;
    print "$line1 \n";
}

Code 2:

#!perl
use autodie;
use warnings;
use strict;

open my $file1,'<','c:/file1.txt';
my @file1 = <$file1>;

open my $file2,'<','c:/file2.txt';
my @file2 =<$file2>;

for (my $n=0; $n<=$#file1; $n++) {
    $file1[$n] .=$file2[$n];
    $file1[$n]=~s/\n/ /;
    print $file1[$n];
}

Code 3:

#!perl
use autodie;
use warnings;
use strict;

open my $file1,'<','c:/file1.txt';
open my $file2,'<','c:/file2.txt';

my %hash;

while(defined(my $line1 = <$file1>)
      and defined(my $line2 = <$file2>)) {
  chomp $line1;
  chomp $line2;
  my ($key, $val) = ($line1,$line2);
  $hash{$key} = $val;
}
print map { "$_ $hash{$_}\n" } sort keys %hash;

Code 4:

#!perl
use autodie;
use warnings;
use strict;

open my $file1,'<','c:/file1.txt';
open my $file2,'<','c:/file2.txt';

while(defined(my $line1 = <$file1>)
      and defined(my $line2 = <$file2>)) {
  $line1 =~ s/(.+)/$1 $line2/;
  print $line1;
}

Code 5:

#!perl
use autodie;
use warnings;
use strict;

open my $file1,'<','c:/file1.txt';
my @file1 =<$file1>;

open my $file2,'<','c:/file2.txt';
my @file2 =<$file2>;

while ((@file1) && (@file2)){ 
    my $m = shift (@file1);
    chomp($m);

    my $n = shift (@file2);
    chomp($n);

    $m .=" ".$n;
    print "$m \n";
}

I have tried something like this:

foreach $file1 (@file2) && foreach $file2 (@file2) {...}

But Perl gave me a syntactic error warning. I was frustrated. But can we run two foreach loops simultaneously?

Thanks, as always, for any comments, suggestions and of course the generous code sharing :)

share|improve this question
1  
Didn't you post a nearly identical question recently? –  user181548 Oct 28 '09 at 12:15
2  
In fact, this sounds like a poll type question with no one right answer so probably should be CW. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 12:24
1  
@Kinopiko, that question I asked a couple of days ago "How can I replace a column of one file with a column of another using Perl?" was more difficult than this one. –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 12:51
    
@Kinopiko, well, I suppose they do share some similaritities but they are different whatsoever. –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 12:55
5  
This is Perl. I always get the feeling that, if I can find only one way to do something, I should be submitting a bug report. –  David Thornley Oct 28 '09 at 16:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This works for any number of files:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my @handles = map { open my $h, '<', $_; $h } @ARGV;

while (@handles){
    @handles = grep { ! eof $_ } @handles;
    my @lines = map { my $v = <$_>; chomp $v; $v } @handles;
    print join(' ', @lines), "\n";
}

close $_ for @handles;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good use of eof. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 12:58
    
BTW, I find my @handles = map { open my $h, '<', $_; $h } @ARGV; preferable. You get rid of the @files array which you do not use elsewhere. I wish I could upvote your answer several times. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 13:13
    
@Sinan Thanks, that's a good idea (answer edited). –  FMc Oct 28 '09 at 13:22
    
@FM, this code of yours works great ! –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 13:35
    
Looks like @ARGV = ("c:/f1.txt","c:/f2.txt"); is more concise than open my $file1,'<','c:/f1.txt'; open my $file2,'<','c:/f2.txt'; –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 13:48

An easy one with minimal error checking:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;

open FILE1, '<file1.txt';
open FILE2, '<file2.txt';

while (defined(my $one = <FILE1>) or defined(my $twotemp = <FILE2>)){
    my $two = $twotemp ? $twotemp : <FILE2>;
    chomp $one if ($one);
    chomp $two if ($two);
    print ''.($one ? "$one " : '').($two ? $two : '')."\n";
}

And no, you can't run two loops simultaneous within the same thread, you'd have to fork, but that would not be guaranteed to run synchronously.

share|improve this answer
    
Without testing, I can recognize there is the ternary operator I was expecting. Ah, this is cool. I myself made several attemtps to use the ternary operator to do the job but with no luck. Thanks alot :) –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 12:16
    
Tested now. It works great! Thanks again! –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 12:20
    
Does not work if the input line is the number zero. Use defined in the conditional operators. –  Rob Kennedy Oct 28 '09 at 14:04
    
Yeah, Rob, true. (Ok, I said that it concatenates for every line of the first file, so this behavior would be somewhat correct ;) ). But that's what I meant with minimal error checking - that there should be more error checking. –  Pascal Oct 28 '09 at 14:16
    
Edit: Ok, adjusted so that it now reads to the end of both files, no matter how long they are. –  Pascal Oct 28 '09 at 14:21

An easier alternative to your Code 5 which allows for an arbitrary number of lines and does not care if files have different numbers of lines (hat tip @FM):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;

use File::Slurp;
use List::AllUtils qw( each_arrayref );

my @lines = map [ read_file $_ ], @ARGV;

my $it = each_arrayref @lines;

while ( my @lines = grep { defined and chomp and length } $it->() ) {
    print join(' ', @lines), "\n";
}

And, without using any external modules:

#!perl
use autodie; use warnings; use strict;

my ($file1, $file2) = @ARGV;

open my $file1_h,'<', $file1;
my @file1 = grep { chomp; length } <$file1_h>;

open my $file2_h,'<', $file2;
my @file2 =  grep { chomp; length } <$file2_h>;

my $n_lines = @file1 > @file2 ? @file1 : @file2;

for my $i (0 .. $n_lines - 1) {
    my ($line1, $line2) = map {
        defined $_ ? $_ : ''
    } $file1[$i], $file2[$i];
    print $line1, ' ', $line2, "\n";
}

If you want to concatenate only the lines that appear in both files:

#!perl
use autodie; use warnings; use strict;

my ($file1, $file2) = @ARGV;

open my $file1_h,'<', $file1;
my @file1 = grep { chomp; length } <$file1_h>;

open my $file2_h,'<', $file2;
my @file2 =  grep { chomp; length } <$file2_h>;

my $n_lines = @file1 < @file2 ? @file1 : @file2;

for my $i (0 .. $n_lines - 1) {
    print $file1[$i], ' ', $file2[$i], "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tested failed. Perl says "Can't locate List/Allutils.pm in @INC". But I'll grab the module and test it again. –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 12:27
1  
+1 for read_file and each_array. I thought about this approach too, but then noticed your answer at the last minute. A person could easily generalize this to handle any N of files as well. –  FMc Oct 28 '09 at 12:41
    
@Sinan, thanks! Module installed and tested the code again. it works great but there's a pesky problem. Perl gives me an error saying "can't locate perl58.dll". of course it can't locate perl58.dll because I'm now running Perl 5.10.1. How can I get rid of this false alarm without downgrading my Perl? –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 12:44
    
@Mike That seems like a separate question onto itself but it seems to me like either there the perl.exe from the previous installation is still in your path or there is some kind of file association issue. What does ftype Perl say? –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 12:48
    
C:/ftype Perl gives me this: perl="C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe" "%1" %* –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 13:20

The most elegant way doesn't involve perl at all:

paste -d' ' file1 file2
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Agreed, but I think the OP's purpose is to learn Perl by working such toy programs. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 12:56
    
@mouviciel, this doesn't look like perl. but I agree it IS concise :) –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 13:16
    
is there a working Perl one-liner like this? I'm wondering. –  Mike Oct 28 '09 at 13:18
1  
@mouviciel: See stackoverflow.com/questions/1636755/… And, please don't use it. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 28 '09 at 14:15
4  
In Perl: system("paste -d' ' $file1 $file2") –  mob Oct 28 '09 at 14:21

If I were a golfing man, I could rewrite @FM's answer as:

($,,$\)=(' ',"\n");@_=@ARGV;open $_,$_ for @_;print
map{chomp($a=<$_>);$a} @_=grep{!eof $_} @_ while @_

which you might be able to turn into a one-liner but that is just evil. ;-)

Well, here it is, under 100 characters:

C:\Temp> perl -le "$,=' ';@_=@ARGV;open $_,$_ for @_;print map{chomp($a =<$_>);$a} @_=grep{!eof $_ }@_ while @_" file1 file2

If it is OK to slurp (and why the heck not — we are looking for different ways), I think I have discovered the path the insanity:

@_=@ARGV;chomp($x[$.-1]{$ARGV}=$_) && eof
and $.=0 while<>;print "@$_{@_}\n" for @x

C:\Temp> perl -e "@_=@ARGV;chomp($x[$.-1]{$ARGV}=$_) && eof and $.=0 while<>;print qq{@$_{@_}\n} for @x" file1 file2

Output:

bye bye chao
hello hola
thank you gracias
share|improve this answer
    
This is not my intention to use this! Nice performance. –  mouviciel Oct 28 '09 at 15:39
1  
+1 with a friggin laser on its head! –  DVK Oct 28 '09 at 17:48
    
@Sinan :) Thanks alot! This wicked one-liner works great: perl -le "$,=' ';@_=@ARGV;open $_,$_ for @_;print map{chomp($a =<$_>);$a} @_=grep{!eof $_ }@_ while @_" "c:/file1.txt" "c:/file2.txt". –  Mike Oct 31 '09 at 12:49
    
@Sinan, this line code does not work: perl -e "@_=@ARGV;chomp $x[$.-1]{$ARGV}=$_ && eof and $.=0 while<>;print qq{@$_{@_}\n} for @x" "c:/f1.txt" "c:/f2.txt". It gives me something like "Can't modify scalar chomp in scalar assignment at -e line 1, near "eof and" Execution of -e aborted due to compilation errors. –  Mike Oct 31 '09 at 12:54
    
@Mike I needed parentheses around the chomp. Should be OK now. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 1 '09 at 12:23

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