Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The code for the proof is

x, d = Reals('x d')
t = (simplify(simplify(((x + d)**2 - x**2)/d, som = True), mul_to_power=True))
print t
prove(Implies(d != 0, t == 2*x + d))
prove(Implies(d == 0, 2 * x + d == 2*x))

and the output is

(2·d·x + d2)/d
proved
proved

Please let me know if you know a more compact proof using Z3Py. Many thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Interesting approach. I wondered if one can use the epsilon-delta definition of limit and do a more direct proof in Z3. I coded it up using the Haskell bindings to Z3 here: http://gist.github.com/LeventErkok/5516651

Unfortunately, Z3 returns "Unknown" for the generated query, which is not surprising due to the need for quantifiers. It'd been really nice if z3 was able to prove this.

I've posted the SMT-Lib translation of the Haskell generated query here: http://rise4fun.com/Z3/igAt if anyone wants to take a peek. (Mechanical translation is not quite human-readable, but if you squint hard enough, you can follow its logic; especially if you compare it to the Haskell source.)

share|improve this answer

You don't need the calls to simplify. You can write

x, d = Reals('x d')
t = ((x + d)**2 - x**2)/d
print t
prove(Implies(d != 0, t == 2*x + d))
prove(Implies(d == 0, 2 * x + d == 2*x))

It can also try it online here.

BTW, we should not confuse this script with a formal proof that the derivative of x^2 is 2x. This kind of proof can be performed in proof assistants like Coq. There, you define, for example, what a derivative is.

Your script is an informal proof (argument) that is assisted by an automated tool (Z3). The assistant (Z3) is being used to automate calculations and prove/discharges some steps of your informal proof. There is nothing wrong with that, but we should not claim this is a formal proof like the ones performed using Coq, where every step is formalized in the system.

share|improve this answer
    
Amanzing, many thanks. –  Juan Ospina May 5 '13 at 11:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.