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Android is based on Linux; can native Linux applications be run on Android?

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Maybe you could clarify your question? In theory you can teach an elephant to dance, but that does not mean that when you meet a wild elephant in a jungle, it will dance for you. Are you asking for the technical possibility, and you are ready to write and compile some code, root your device etc, or do you seek an out-of-the-box/install-a-single-app solution? –  K.L. Oct 9 '13 at 7:00
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11 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

In general, no. Android apps generally run in a sandboxed Java-like virtual machine, so have to be written in Java or some language that compiles to virtual-machine bytecode that use the Android API.

However, the virtual machine does run on top of the underlying Linux OS, and there are ways to call native code. See http://developer.android.com/sdk/ndk/1.6_r1/index.html

So, while it is technically possible to run native Linux programs, as there is a Linux kernel running beneath everything, most users would not be able to install such applications or use them. (If you have root access or are building your own firmware, then you can do whatever you want.)

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That's a rather indirect answer. Yes, Android can run Java apps, since it's a Linux distribution that comes with a JVM. But that JVM is obviously a native application itself, so there is at least one native Linux application that can run on Android/Linux. –  MSalters Oct 28 '09 at 13:20
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Actually, Android doesn't come with a JVM, it comes with a Dalvik VM. The Dalvik VM comes with a Java language implementation that compiles down to Dalvik bytecode, but not to JVM bytecode. I believe there's also a tool that can convert compile JVM bytecode into dalvik bytecode. Wikipedia (as usual) has a pretty good introduction to Dalvik: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalvik_virtual_machine –  Bob McCormick Oct 28 '09 at 16:25
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I don't think it's an "indirect answer." I understand the question to mean "Can a typical user install native Linux applications on Android." I think the answer to that is No, but obviously, as Android runs on top of Linux, there are native Linux programs running. –  Kristopher Johnson Oct 28 '09 at 23:31
    
you can take a look at my answer –  sherif Nov 6 '12 at 20:54
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Android does not run X Windows, nor does it have many of the standard GNU libraries. So, since most native linux applications require one or both of these, most will not run.

In addition, even Java programs can be limited, because the version of Java that Android applications are written in is a subset of the standard Java library.

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Not directly, no. Android's C runtime library, bionic, is not binary compatible with the GNU libc, which most Linux distributions use.

You can always try to recompile your binaries for Android and pray.

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Yes you can. I have installed a complete Debian distribution in a chroot-jail enviroment using debootstrap. (You need a rooted device) I am now running ssh, apache, mysql, php and even a samba server under android on my htc-desire with no problems. It is possible to run x applications using a remote x server via ssh. It even runs openoffice.org and firefox. You can use this: http://code.google.com/p/android-xserver/ to run X-application on localhost but my HTC-desire has a to small screen to be productive :-) But it might be usefull on a Eee Pad Transformer or something like that.

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yes you can ;-)

the simplest way is using this ->http://www.androidfanatic.com/community-forums.html?func=view&catid=9&id=2248

The old link is dead it was for a Debian install script There is an app for that in the android market but you will need root

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nice enthusiasm –  Adam F Jan 8 '12 at 22:12
    
That link is dead. It's helpful to give the gist of the solution in the answer, so it's useful long after the links have died. –  Brent Foust Nov 21 '13 at 6:14
    
play.google.com/store/apps/… –  sherif Nov 23 '13 at 13:06
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You can get an ARM cross compiler that runs on Linux here. You can also download the Android NDK and compile some command line apps. I do not have any personal experience with using C++ with either solution, but I have compiled a few simple things with both. It is my understanding that the NDK is not a full C++ compiler as there have been complaints that it will not compile some common C++ code.

Note that since I am a new user, I cannot post the NDK link... :/

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Here's a link to the NDK, here's hoping it is allowed: developer.android.com/sdk/ndk/index.html –  JimR Oct 29 '10 at 1:58
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android only use linux kernel, that means the GNU tool chain like gcc as are not implemented in android, so if you want run a linux app in android, you need recompile it with google's tool chain( NDK ).

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Yes, they can. If you do not have a rooted phone/tablet, then you could download c4droid here to compile your apps. Then, you could download Kevin Boone's KBOX here to run the program.

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Yes they can if they're compiled under an arm linux first or using a cross compiler. Debian arm versatile works, there's also arm-eabi for compiling under x86 linux to arm linux.

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I think this article can provide a solution : Linux Today - Compile, Install and Run Linux apps on Android
Hope it helps.

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Hell, of course yes, with several limitations.

Android is a kinda special Linux distribution, with no usual suff like X11, and you can't install Apache2 with apt-get. But if you have ARM cross-compiler, you can copy your ELF files to the device, and run it from a terminal app or if you have installed some SSHD app, you can even use SSH from your desktop/notebook to access the Android device.

To copy and launch a native Linux executable, you have not root your device. That's the point, where I am, I've compiled my own tiny webserver to Android (and also for webOS), it runs, hallelujah.

There comes the issues, which I can't answer:

  1. My tiny webserver use only stdlib and pthreads. I have no idea how to use the (native Linux) libraries comes with Android, there are useful ones, altough, I can live without them.

  2. Now I can launch my app from a terminal app by hand. But I don't know, what's the best way of deploying such native apps to Android. I think I should be write a small Android app, which launches the server and not letting automatically stopped by the system (say, as like music players never killed). Also, if its a service, it should somehow started on boot. I'm not familiar with Android.

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