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I'm designing a new API and I'm struggling with some decisions. I've read tons of blogs on SOAP vs REST and I used the popular APIs (Paypal, Amazon, etc.) as my guidelines.

I ended up with 2 endpoints in my API: one for SOAP and one for REST (XML). The SOAP one looks pretty good, but the XML interface looks somewhat strange. I'm calling it "strange" because I ended up with namespaces in some of my tags. For example:

[sample1]

<EnvelopeRequest xmlns:c1='http://foobar/CarrierX'>
    <Weight>1.0</Weight>
    <PostmarkDate>5/3/2013</PostmarkDate>
    <c1:ShippingMethod>Ground</c1:ShippingMethod>
    <c1:Notification>a@b.com</c1:Notification>
</EnvelopeRequest>

[sample2]

<EnvelopeRequest xmlns:cs='http://foobar/SpecialCarrier'>
    <Weight>1.0</Weight>
    <PostmarkDate>5/3/2013</PostmarkDate>
    <cs:Shape>Flat</cs:Shape>
</EnvelopeRequest>

The reason the XML interface has namespaces is because it is auto-generated from the class definition (which has some inheritance). We are using WCF btw. That works just fine for SOAP (the WSDL is derived from the same class), because SOAP hides all the ugliness in the client proxies. However, after looking at many REST/XML services, I don't think I've seen namespaces being used too often. This also kinda scares me because I'm thinking that I would love to have a JSON interface in the near future, and JSON doesn't support namespaces.

My decision to make the API SOAP friendly came from the fact that many of our customers use Enterprise solutions which thrive on SOAP. But lately, with the growing popularity of Python and Ruby, which new clients seem to adopt more often, I'm starting to second guess my initial decision. The main thing that bothers me is the namespaces in the XML interface, but is it really an issue? Are namespaces in a REST/XML API such a big no-no that I should change my design?

If I do change my design, then my (2 previous) requests would look like so:

[sample1]

<EnvelopeRequest>
    <Weight>1.0</Weight>
    <PostmarkDate>5/3/2013</PostmarkDate>
    <CarrierX>
        <ShippingMethod>Ground</ShippingMethod>
        <Notification>a@b.com</Notification>
    </CarrierX>
</EnvelopeRequest>

[sample2]

<EnvelopeRequest>
    <Weight>1.0</Weight>
    <PostmarkDate>5/3/2013</PostmarkDate>
    <SpecialCarrier>
        <Shape>Flat</Shape>
    </SpecialCarrier>
</EnvelopeRequest>

And yes, this would allow me to have a JSON interface in the future.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Removing namespaces would be a problem if by doing so you create the possibility of ambiguity in a given message. Is it possible for someone somewhere to create an EnvelopeRequest message with a Shape element that might be interpreted (by code or by people reading the message) in more than one way? The reason to introduce namespaces is to preclude this possibility. Tools like WCF's auto-generator are not able to answer this question in the general case so they err on the side of caution.

Only you can know the set of possible valid messages. In my experience, it's usually preferable to remove namespaces for the sake of not confusing your users/clients. There are a few reasons why I might change that preference:

  • I expect my message format to be used widely and intermixed with other formats. (A good example is the Atom syndication format)
  • I'm using someone else's widely used (and namespaced) format and planning to intermix it with my own (e.g. embedding XHTML inside my message).
  • I expect to embed a message of a given format inside a message of the same format (e.g. XSLT stylesheets that generate XSLT stylesheets).

In that latter case, you might find it convenient (though not absolutely necessary) to use namespaces to separate the inner message from the message that is carrying it by using different prefixes. I don't think any of these cases apply very often.

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Thanks. Yes, none of those 3 cases apply to me. The namespaces that were generated in my XML interface were automatically generated by the framework since I used inheritance in my classes: CarrierX and SpecialCarrier are classes which inherit from EnvelopeRequest. Of course, internal implementation shouldn't dictate how my API looks like. But your first point also became an issue when CarrierX and SpecialCarrier had to define the same property: "Service". It meant different things for each carrier, so namespaces were a good thing. I think I will remove the namespaces and rename Service in one. –  MrTibs May 6 '13 at 18:22

I would ponder why you have namespace in the first place, those are some strange payloads.

But, disregarding that, no, the namespaces are not a big deal. Namespaces almost inevitably run afoul with XPath and XSL (since they tend to be namespace aware), but when consuming the document wholesale, a lot of times folks just ignore the namespace component completely, so in the end there's no difference.

I would clean up the namespaces for the sake of cleaning them up semantically, but not necessarily for the sake of the consumers. From a practical stand point, it's not that big a deal.

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"Run afoul of"? Aren't you just saying that people who use XPath and XSL should learn to use namespaces properly? Same as those who have trouble consuming XML with namespaces because they think XML is just text? –  John Saunders May 4 '13 at 1:32

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