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Say I have a class that defines a collection of my days and how wacky they are. Is it better to initialize my @scores variable in the initialize function like so:

class WackyDayScorer
  attr_reader :scores
  def initialize(start = Time.now, max = 90.days)
    @start  = start
    @limit  = start - max
    @scores = get_scores
  end

private
  def get_scores
    result = []
    t = @start.clone
    until t < max
      result << score_wackiness(t)
      t -= 1.day
    end
    result
  end
end

or initialize it in the get_scores method like so:

class WackyDayScorer
  attr_reader :scores

  def initialize(start = Time.now, max = 90.days)
    @start = start
    @limit = start - max
    get_scores
  end

private
  def get_scores
    @scores = []
    t = @start.clone
    until t < max
      @scores << score_wackiness(t)
      t -= 1.day
    end
  end
end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first one is just plain wrong. You are saying

@scores = get_scores

But get_scores does not return a useful value, so this is nuts. Instead, get_scores sets @scores directly and internally as a side effect.

The second one is at least coherent.

Personally, though, I would not do either of the things you do. I would say what you say the first time:

@scores = get_scores

But my implementation of get_scores would not touch any ivar. It would return an actual value:

  def get_scores
    scores = []
    # do stuff to scores
    return scores # or simply, scores
  end
share|improve this answer
    
I would not return any value, since idiomatic Ruby uses implicit returns from method invocations. –  Chris May 3 '13 at 23:55
    
Right, but local variable value to be returned still needs to be in dead last position so as to be returned implicitly. –  matt May 3 '13 at 23:58
    
Fixed the bug you pointed out in the first example, thx. Seems like you're saying the first solution is the one you would pick. –  muirbot May 4 '13 at 0:01
    
In your edited version, yes, exactly. Unfortunately your edited version turns my answer into nonsense. :( –  matt May 4 '13 at 0:02
    
Oh, and the reason I like the first way better (now) is that it is dead clear what initialize is doing: it's setting the three ivars. In the second one, it is not at all obvious, without looking in two places, what is going on. –  matt May 4 '13 at 0:04

If you want to handle something in initialization, create a private method to handle the calculation and then set the instance variable in #initialize. I wouldn't set it in the method in case you want to reuse that calculation elsewhere in the class without wiping out your instance variable.

class WackyDayScorer
  attr_accessor :scores

  def initialize(start = DateTime.now, max = 90.days)
    @start = start
    @limit = start - max
    @scores = calculate_scores
  end

private

  def calculate_scores
    (@limit..@start).to_a.map { |date_time| score_wackiness(date_time) }
  end
end

In #calculate_scores, we are creating a range between the limit date and the start (counting backwards, as you were doing) and sending each result to the #score_wackiness method.

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I decided against this because this value will always be calculated every time someone uses this class. Why put off the inevitable? –  muirbot May 4 '13 at 0:04
    
updated the answer to what I think you want –  Chris May 4 '13 at 0:16

I'd recommend explicitly defining the getter for scores, memoizing the calculation and skipping all the ceremony:

class WackyDayScorer
  def initialize(start = Time.now, max = 90.days)
    @start  = start
    @limit  = start - max
  end

  def scores
    @scores ||= begin
      result = []
      t = @start.clone
      until t < max
        result << score_wackiness(t)
        t -= 1.day
      end
      result
    end
  end
end

This is basically what you are doing anyway, but it's more direct.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this. But I don't think I'd call it "memoization"; it's just lazy initialization (thru the getter). –  matt May 4 '13 at 1:58
    
@matt Using the ||= and assigning it to an instance variable is memoization. You can read more about what memoization is here. –  Cade May 4 '13 at 3:48
    
I don't agree and I don't think you're reading the article correctly. Memoization is the technique of storing the value of f(x) for each different x under some expensive function f, so that if the same call is made again for the same argument value, it doesn't have to be recalculated. See for example github.com/djberg96/memoize –  matt May 4 '13 at 4:18
    
||= is merely standard ruby idiom for initialization of an instance variable –  matt May 4 '13 at 4:19
    
And if we store the result of the calculation when we don't supply a value for x in f(x) so that, when a second call is made to f, it doesn't have to recalculate the value... seems like memoization to me. I'm alright with being wrong here, but this is the first time I've ever seen someone argue that the use of ||= in Ruby is not memoization. Googling various phrases related to Ruby and memoization seems to turn up a lot of misinformation if ||= is truly not memoization. –  Cade May 4 '13 at 13:44

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