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I have a numpy array containing gaps of various sizes. I would like to fill the smaller gaps of size < N with linear interpolation.

In other words for:

N = 2

and

x = np.array([10., 20., np.nan, 40., 50., np.nan, np.nan, np.nan, 10.,0.,-10.])

I would like to fill the third (index 2) entry with 30.0.

I am open to algorithmic approaches, but my intention was to create an array that would be an indicator of the size of the local gap:

[0 0 1 0 0 3 3 3 0 0]  

or of the gap being too big:

[0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0]

With that in hand I can record the indices of gaps that are small enough and use interp1d Is there an economical, functional way to do this? I know how to do it with an advance-mark-advance-mark loop.

Thanks,

Eli

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So, in the first array ([0 0 1 0 0 3 3 3 0 0]) 1 and 3 indicate the number of sequential elements without a "proper" number? –  SethMMorton May 3 '13 at 23:49
    
Exactly, SethMMorton. –  Eli S May 4 '13 at 1:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if this is exactly what you are looking for, but this is my suggestion:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> from itertools import groupby
>>>
>>> x = np.array([10., 20., np.nan, 40., 50., np.nan, np.nan, np.nan, 10.,0.,-10.])
>>> y = np.zeros_like(x, dtype=int)
>>> y[np.where(np.isnan(x))] = 1 # Locate where the array is nan
>>> y
array([0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0])
>>> z = []
>>> for a, b in groupby(y, lambda x: x == 0):
...     if a: # Where the value is 0, simply append to the list
...         z.extend(list(b))
...     else: # Where the value is one, replace 1 with the number of sequential 1's
...         l = len(list(b))
...         z.extend([l]*l)
>>> z
[0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 3, 3, 3, 0, 0, 0]
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